Over the past few years, our forging operations in Chattanooga, Tennessee, have been working vigorously to improve product quality and deliveries. As you have seen with our In-Stock Guarantee, we remain committed to manufacturing the highest quality products in the market, stocking over 275 of our most popular chain and forged rigging attachment products and guaranteeing to ship them in 3 business days.

As part of this commitment to quality, we implemented some changes that resulted in even higher quality shackles. These changes include larger CM shackle markings and a new shackle pin design.

CM shackle markings

Enhanced Shackle Identification Markings

The forged identification markings on our CM shackles are now the largest and most user-friendly on the market.  The lettering has draft and rounded edges for use with synthetics. Some of the benefits of the larger and more legible lettering are:

CM shackle markings

Old Shackle Size

CM shackle markings

New Shackle Size

Improved operator safety by reducing the risk of users misreading or not being able to read important size and WLL information.

Reduction in replacement costs by decreasing necessary out-of-service issues due to worn and illegible identification.

Easier identification of the product as a CM shackle with a larger CM logo forged into the side.

CM shackle markings

Old Shackle Logo

CM shackle markings

New Shackle Logo

New Pins

We have also changed the shackle pins on our Screw Pin Anchor shackles (SPA) to provide more efficient thread fitting inside and outside of the shackle.

CM shackle marking

New High Strength Pin

Both the enhanced ID markings and the new pins are now on all shackles we ship today. We will continue to look for even more ways to improve the safety and durability of our shackles, to ensure we are providing the highest quality products to our customers.

This article was originally posted on June 13, 2013. Updates were made on April 6, 2017 to keep our information current.

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shank hooks

When hooks and components are produced in accordance with the DIN 15400 specification, you can rest assured that the manufacturer has met stringent production criteria to produce a high-quality product. DIN 15400 is the “Standard of Excellence” used in the heavy crane industry. Our heavy-duty crane hooks produced by our Stahlhammer Bommern GmbH (STB) business in Germany are designed to meet this standard.

Specification DIN 15400 was developed in the early 1940’s to provide requirements to manufacturers for the production and finishing of shank hooks. This specification not only gives guidance for hook production but also includes dimensional requirements for nuts and trunnions. The standard specifies requirements intended to ensure the reliability of forged hooks.

DIN 15400 offers guidance for capacity ratings of hooks, similar to CMAA, based on various component input of crane usage. This is known as drive groups in the specification.

DIN 15400 includes requirements for threading of crane hooks, nuts and cross pieces to ensure a quality product is produced.

DIN 15400 also includes guidance for markings, testing, heat treatment, surface conditions, dimensional accuracy and mechanical properties.

Learn more about heavy-duty crane hooks from Columbus McKinnon.  Designed to stringent, globally recognized DIN standards, our high-quality un-machined and machined products range in capacity from 1 to 1250 metric tons.

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Improper use or care of shackles can result in serious accidents that not only injure employees but damage property as well. To avoid this, shackle inspection is critical. In accordance with ASME B30.26, shackles should be visually inspected before every use.

If any of these six conditions are apparent during shackle inspection, the shackle should be discarded and replaced.

shackle inspection

Example of a Worn Shackle

Condition 1:

Any part of the shackle is worn more than 10 percent of the original dimensions. If this happens, it typically means that the physical size of the shackle is smaller, therefore it cannot handle the rated load and becomes dangerous to use.

Condition 2:

The shackle has excessive pitting, corrosion, nicks or gouges. If a shackle has excessive pitting, that is usually a sign of corrosion. When this happens, material is being lost and the shackle dimensionally becomes smaller. Therefore, it cannot handle its rated capacity. Similarly, nicks and gouges are an intrusion on the original dimensions of the shackle and create a stress raiser on the shackle. Material is moved or removed from the shackle, making it smaller in size and unable to handle the rated load.

shackle inspection

Example of a Bent Shackle

Condition 3:

Load bearing components are bent, twisted, distorted, stretched, elongated, cracked or broken.

Condition 4:

Indication of heat damage. When shackles are manufactured, they go through a heat treatment process. Therefore, being exposed to heat in the field can reverse that process and weaken the shackle. Heat damage can be difficult to see, but there are a few key items to look for:

  • Blue or straw discoloration of the shackle material
  • Weld spatter. When weld spatter lands on the shackle, the heat from that molten dot of metal is immediately transferred to the shackle, changing the properties of that shackle.

Condition 5:

Missing or illegible manufacturer’s name or trademark, working load limit or size. Every CM shackle is forged with the CM logo, its body or diameter size, trace code, USA, “Forged” and its specified working load limit. These markings should be visible on the shackle.

Condition 6:

Load pins are bent or have visibly damaged threads. When load pins are bent, the pin has gone past its elastic limit. If the product continues to be used, there is a higher chance of a dropped load, which can injure operators and cause property damage. Damaged threads mean that the pin is not making 100% engagement with the shackle. This can lead to a failure of the shackle.

For more information on shackle inspection and safe shackle use, check out the following:

Nine Important Rules to Follow When Using Shackles
Shackle Markings, Materials, and Appropriate Standards
New CM Shackle Markings and Pins Lead to Improved Operator Safety
Customer Concerns over Recommended Shackle Pin Length

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Pfaff Rail Systems Help Maintain London Underground Tube Trains

by Christie Lagowski March 9, 2017

At Ealing Common Depot, a railway service workshop of the London Underground, the tube subway trains used on the District Line will now be maintained with the aid of a lifting system from Pfaff Verkehrstechnik GmbH located in Kissing, Germany. On account of its futuristic design, the maintenance staff has nicknamed the versatile and unique system the “Transformer.” The […]

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Going to USITT? Stop by and Visit Columbus McKinnon

by Gisela Clark March 3, 2017

The 57th annual USITT Show kicks off next week. The USITT show is the largest full production trade show in America, featuring 200 exhibitors and special exhibits from around the industry. USITT is the leader in life-long learning opportunities for the entertainment design and technology industry. The conference focuses on various workshops that help educate attendees on several aspects of […]

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Columbus McKinnon Holds Hoist Workshops in Russia

by Dmitry Smirnov February 16, 2017

To showcase Columbus McKinnon and its products for the entertainment industry, the company presented two hoist workshops in Russia last year. Held at the Global Show Trade (Coda Audio) in Moscow, the first workshop was on January 20 and the second on May 12. More than 30 guests from leading Russian rental, installation and rigging companies took part in each session. The workshops were conducted by Columbus McKinnon Associates, […]

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Our Most Popular Blog Posts of 2016

by Gisela Clark February 2, 2017

As we look back at 2016 and are busy planning for 2017, it’s interesting to see which of our blog topics were the most popular with our readers last year. With all of our blog posts, we look to provide you with valuable information to help keep you safe and make your job easier. We […]

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Tips for Rigging with Eye Bolts

by Peter Cooke January 17, 2017

Jubal, an entertainment rigger from Local One IATSE and recent safety webinar attendee, asked the following rigging question about eye bolts: Is it necessary to use only one washer when securing eye bolts or can the washers be stacked if necessary? Peter Cooke, Columbus McKinnon Training Manager and Safety Webinar Presenter, answers: If more than one washer […]

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3 Safety Tips When Installing Your CM Trolley

by Peter Cooke January 7, 2017

Whether it’s a hoist, trolley or rigging equipment, proper use, inspection and maintenance is important to ensure operator safety at all times. Operators of material handling equipment should adhere to the manufacturer’s installation, inspection and maintenance requirements outlined in the product’s operation and maintenance manual (O&M manual). Beam clamps and trolleys are critical components of […]

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Does the Age of a Crane Prevent Installation of a Collision Avoidance System?

by Jon Walters November 17, 2016

Al, a CMCO distributor salesman, trainer and recent safety webinar attendee, asks the following question about applying a collision avoidance system: Does the age of a crane prevent it from having a collision avoidance system installed?  Jon Walters, Magnetek trainer and safety webinar presenter, answers: No. The age of a crane has no impact on […]

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