Author: Columbus McKinnon Corporation

Safety Remains Top of Mind with Third Annual Safety Calendar Contest

Safety Remains Top of Mind with Third Annual Safety Calendar Contest

third annual safety calendar

Safety should always be at the core of how a company operates – and Columbus McKinnon is no exception. Over our long history, the safety of our employees and customers has remained paramount and is a continued focus for us as we move into 2016.

Safety at Work, Home or Play

As part of our continued commitment to safety, we kicked off our third annual Safety Calendar Contest last year. We asked the children and grandchildren of our Associates around the world to submit drawings on the theme of “Safety at Work, Home or Play.” The children took this contest to heart and we received 90 entries from 12 of our locations in 9 countries around the world. The entries we received were creative and inspiring!

A group of artists spent hours poring over the entries to choose to 13 winners and 9 runners-up that would be featured in the 2016 calendar. Judging was based on originality, artistic merit and expression of the safety theme.

In addition to creating great artwork, it is encouraging to see the safety messages our children are expressing. The messages for 2016 covered swim and fire safety, the importance of wearing protective equipment, and good decision making while driving (avoiding alcohol and watching for pedestrians). A new topic covered this year was internet safety. As the future workforce, it is important to instill a safety-conscious work ethic in children at a young age. You can never start too young!

It’s our goal at Columbus McKinnon to help our customers lift, position and secure items in a safe and productive way and we will continue to develop products, services and training to achieve just that. Happy New Year and we look forward to sharing new and useful information to keep safety top of mind throughout the coming year.

This post was written by Laura Miller, former Corporate Health & Safety Manager for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

Safety Takes Center Stage at Columbus McKinnon with Second Annual Safety Calendar Contest

Safety Takes Center Stage at Columbus McKinnon with Second Annual Safety Calendar Contest

second annual safety calendar
Throughout Columbus McKinnon’s 140 year history, safety has always been an important part of the way we do business. Not only is the safety of our Associates important, but the safety of our customers is also a primary focus in the development of our products, services and training programs.

In the spirit of our focus on safety, we kicked off our second annual Safety Calendar Contest last year. We asked the children and grandchildren of our Associates around the world to submit drawings on the theme of “Safety at Work, Home or Play.” The children truly took this contest to heart and we received nearly 100 entries from 14 of our locations in 10 countries around the world. The entries we received were quite creative!

We asked an artist from Buffalo, N.Y., C. Mari Pack, to choose 15 winners and 16 runners-up that would be featured in the 2015 calendar. Judging was based on originality, artistic merit and expression of the safety theme.

In addition to creating great artwork, it is encouraging to see the safety messages our children are expressing. As the future workforce, it is important to instill a safety-conscious work ethic in children at a young age.

It’s our goal at Columbus McKinnon to help our customers lift, position and secure items in a safe and productive way. Throughout 2015 and into the coming years, we will continue to focus on safety and help our customers meet this goal. Happy New Year to all of you. Stay tuned for more great articles on material handling product safety, training courses and other helpful topics to keep you working safe all year long.

This post was written by Laura Miller, former Corporate Health & Safety Manager for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

CMCO University is off to a great start!

CMCO University is off to a great start!

CMCO University

Last month Columbus McKinnon kicked off its inaugural session of CMCO University with great success. More than 15 distributor associates from across the country came to our  Niagara Training Center in Tonawanda, N.Y.,  to “Profit from Knowledge,” learning detailed information about our products and how to best sell and position them in the marketplace.

CMCO’s Niagara Training Center is one of the most comprehensive hoist, crane and rigging training centers in the country. With more than 40 hoists, including powered and manual hoists, as well as a variety of crane components and rigging products, attendees gained valuable experience operating the products. They were able to see the interior workings of the hoists, learn about their unique features and conduct hands-on product comparisons.

Testing out Products

Not only did the distributors learn about our products, they also had a chance to enjoy the unique sights and tastes of Buffalo, N.Y., including a trip to one of the Seven Wonders of the World – Niagara Falls; a visit to downtown Buffalo and First Niagara Center for a Buffalo Sabres hockey game; and various meals to experience Buffalo’s famous cuisine.

With the success of our first session, CMCO University classes are filling up fast. Keep an eye out for information on upcoming sessions – we’ll be scheduling throughout 2014.

To learn more about all of our training opportunities, visit our web site.

This post was written by Joshua Karczewski, former Distributor Marketing & Product Launch Manager for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

Recent Sight and Sound Theatre Installation Incorporates the Latest of American Technology

Recent Sight and Sound Theatre Installation Incorporates the Latest of American Technology

 

PA-Theatre-Interior

Sight and Sound Theatre, the largest faith-based theatre in America, partnered with Mountain Productions to complete a full and permanent hoist/motor installation at their Lancaster County, PA theatre.  Using all American Made chain hoists provided by Columbus McKinnon, Mountain Productions prepared and coordinated the package for ease of installation, while Motion Labs provided the electrics, controllers and programming. Sight and Sound continues its tradition of using the most state-of-the-art equipment to maintain the highest quality productions for which the theatre is famous.

D8+ Chain Hoists are the hoist of choice in theatre applications.

IMG_7798
Sight and Sound selected our new model Lodestar D8 chain hoists, (1 ton -Model L – and 1/2 ton – Model F), featuring a double brake on each hoist.  The Lodestar D8 is legendary in the industry, and we have recently added several features to the hoist, further ensuring steady and reliable operation.

Along with the Lodestar D8 units, Prostar chain hoists were also installed. The Prostar is a lighter, quieter and more portable hoist that is designed for unique rigging applications in tight quarters. Combined, the Lodestar D8 and Prostar offer versatility, allowing for a variety of rigging configurations at the theatre.

The motor control and load monitoring systems were supplied by Motion Laboratories, a cutting edge company known for their high quality power distribution and motor control systems. The state-of-the-art PLC touchscreen system handles motor control and load monitoring at the theatre. The ability to program specific presets into the system makes the PLC an efficient motor control/load monitoring solution. Sight and Sound’s professional riggers will be able to lower and raise loads with ease, and rely on the system’s precision to always keep equipment on point.  Load Cells will be used for accurate load monitoring, supporting the safety of the system.

New rigging grid reduces maintenance time and show preparation.

One of the key benefits of this system is the amount of time the theatre will save on maintenance and preparation for shows. Glen Broderson from Sight and Sound led his team in making the decision to install the new rigging grid. He expressed how much easier it will be to pinpoint individual electrics for maintenance thanks to the soft limit system. This also makes prep time between productions quicker and more convenient. “With the new system, going from a 40 ft trim to a 30 ft trim is just a push of a few buttons,” Glen shared. The whole process has been valuable to Glen and his team.  Everyone is excited to see how the theatre will use the installation in future productions.

Sight and Sound Theatre

Always striving to push the envelope with new technology and productions, the Sight and Sound Theatre remains an innovator in the theatrical industry. If you happen to be in the neighborhood, consider checking out their latest production of Noah. 

Thank you to Mountain Productions, for sharing this application story and to the Sight & Sound Theatre  for use of their photography.  For more original photos of this installation, check out  Mountain Productions’ Blog.

Dixie Industries Sixth Wheel Offers a Safe Alternative to Standard Crank on Trailer Landing Gear

Dixie Industries Sixth Wheel Offers a Safe Alternative to Standard Crank on Trailer Landing Gear

Sixth Wheel Ratchet

We are proud to announce an innovative and ergonomic approach to truck safety for raising and lowering landing gear with our new Dixie Industries Sixth Wheel Ratchet.  Dixie Industries is a well-known name in the trucking and rigging industries for its ratchet binders, chain assemblies, and heavy-duty components and in forestry and farming industries.

The Sixth Wheel Ratchet boasts numerous features that set it apart from the standard S-crank:

  • Ergonomically reduces injury risk while operating trailer landing gear – operator can use an ergonomically-correct posture, utilizing body weight while reducing muscle exertion versus a standard crank that operates in a complete circle and requires individuals to exert extremely high forces in postures that are biomechanically inefficient.
  • The Sixth Wheel is a proven solution preferred by 80% of drivers in actual use tests.
  • Already in use today – Schneider National , Inc. compiled a study on the Sixth Wheel’s effectiveness and decided to outfit their entire fleet with Dixie Industries Sixth Wheel Ratchet.
  • A cost effective solution to the ever growing expense of workers compensation claims – a single shoulder surgery is an estimated $42,000 cost to a trucking company or owner-operator. Eliminating just one shoulder injury could provide enough savings to outfit an entire fleet of trailers with Sixth Wheel ratchets.
  • Designed to fit all standard landing gear – available in three lengths, the Sixth Wheel Ratchet fits all trailers and all standard landing gear.
  • Self-locking security cap provides security – made of hardened steel, the self-locking pin and cap can only be removed by using heavy duty shop equipment like a torch or grinding tool.
  • Patented technology – there is only one Sixth Wheel Ratchet, don’t be fooled by knock-offs. Look for US Patent 7,021,659 stamped on all authentic Dixie Industries Sixth Wheel units.

See it in action today. Watch the demo video below:

Want to learn more about this product? Please call our customer service department at 1-800-888-0985 or your local CMCO Sales Manager.

Want to learn more about Load Securement? Click here to view our training offering.

This post was written by Joshua Karczewski, former Distributor Marketing & Product Launch Manager for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

A Safe New Year in 2013

A Safe New Year in 2013

As we start out in 2013, here are some New Year’s Resolutions to be made by employees who want to have a safe year: Happy New Year 2013!

I vow to come into work ready for a safe day. I will be clear headed and ready to focus on my work with a positive attitude. I will be aware that there are risks and hazards in my workplace that I can control. I will take responsibility for my safety. I will look forward to going home at the end of the day without an injury.

I will take a moment for safety whenever I start a new task during the day. I will ask myself: Do I have the right tools? Have I checked the equipment properly before using it? Is the equipment set up to reduce any muscle strain on my body?

I will be responsible for the housekeeping in my area. I will make certain that the housekeeping in my work area allows me to do my job safely. I will not leave tools on stairs or on walking surfaces. I will maintain space for movement in the aisles.

I will take control of my safety by reporting any unsafe conditions to my supervisor. I will ask what is going to be done about the unsafe condition. If it is not corrected in a timely fashion, I will also report my concern to a member of my safety team for follow up.

I will wear the proper Personal Protective Equipment. I will wear my safety glasses with side shields in all designated areas. If a respirator, hardhat or hearing protection is required in an area or for a task, I will make certain that I wear the additional protection at all times.

I will use the right tool for the job. I will carry my tools to do the work over to the job so I am not tempted to grab the nearest object and use it. I will inspect my tools before use and not use tools in poor condition. I will clean up and put back my tools after each job so I know where to find them.

I will check my equipment for safe and proper operation before use. I will perform a walk-around and steering and brake check every time I get on a forklift. I will not use a piece of machinery that does not have the safety features in place and working.

I will lock out all equipment before I put my hands or body into an operating piece of machinery. I will carry my lock with me at all times so I can lock out equipment. If I have a question on a lock out procedure, I will ask a supervisor. I will test the equipment that I have locked out to make certain that it is off.

I will be aware of protecting my back and other muscles. I will stretch before jobs and periodically during the work day. I will look at positioning myself to avoid muscle strain and fatigue. I will determine if a piece of equipment can do the job better than putting strain on my body.

I will handle myself safely not only on the job but at home. I will wear my seat belt while driving. I will wear the same protective equipment for tasks at home that would be required at work. I will check my home and arrange to have unsafe conditions repaired.

This post was written by Peg Simons, former Corporate Health & Safety Manager for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

 

Wire Rope Hoist Training Insights & Why Certification Matters

Wire Rope Hoist Training Insights & Why Certification Matters

Have you ever opened a Shaw-Box 700 Series wire rope hoist to see its inner workings? Do you know what the ideal preventative maintenance schedule should be on a Yale World Series, or how to properly double reeve a Cable King? The Columbus McKinnon training programs answer all these questions and a whole lot more.

In the Wire Rope Hoist Repair Certification class that I attended, each student is exposed to fully operational hoists on girders to unpowered models on accessible dollies. The class was taught by Columbus McKinnon’s training manager Peter Cooke, who has over 16 years of experience. His mix of traditional classroom instruction paired with hands-on training provides the complete setting for this certification course.

Certification is becoming more important.

When asked about the importance of training, many students replied that they were not allowed to work on a company’s hoist unless they furnished proof of certification. This seemed to be a popular response and the direction that the industry is heading.

This certification course is offered over 2 days, and gives each student an accreditation to work in the field with these hoists. In these classes, there are as many seasoned veterans as there are industry rookies which is a testament to the importance placed on certification. Everyone counts.

What material is covered during the training?

A student can expect to spend most of class time taking apart and studying the components of each hoist. Upon breakdown of the hoists, Peter teaches the proper way to inspect and replace parts, reviews wiring schematics and how to access and replace normal wear items. Over the 2 days with fellow industry technicians, there were many opportunities to discuss the tricks of the trade and best practice procedures which students can implement in their current positions.

When looking to further your expertise and gain the certifications required in many of today’s industrial settings, look no further than the Columbus McKinnon training programs. Click here to view a complete listing of training programs and to access the newest training catalog.

Be safe. Get trained.

This post was written by Dan Daumen, former  Product Manager for After Sales Solutions at Columbus McKinnon.

Where’s your CM?

Where’s your CM?

Although I have only been at Columbus McKinnon for 5 years, our company has been designing and manufacturing hoists and rigging products for over 135 years. Brands like CM, Yale, Coffing, Little Mule, Duff-NortonBudgitShaw-Box, Chester, Dixie, Cady, and Camlok (all of which are from Columbus McKinnon) continue to be recognized as providing superior material handling products to companies around the world.

No matter what facility I visit, I can usually find a product from Columbus McKinnon. Sometimes I see our products when I least expect it. While visiting the Maine Maritime Museum in Bath, Maine, I noticed the bell on the Sherman Zwicker (a 1942 schooner) was hanging on a CM shackle.

Maine Maritime Museum in Bath, Maine 1 Maine Maritime Museum in Bath, Maine 2

I also saw a CM Lodestar being used on a dock to unload lobster boats.

Lobster Boats

Although this picture is not a shining example of how to maintain and attach a hoist to a jib (or in this case a pipe), it is just another example of our products being everywhere. (By the way, we do offer training classes on crane and hoist maintenance and proper rigging techniques!)

So we would like to know “WHERE’S YOUR CM”!

You can post your CMCO product pictures on our facebook fan page wall or e-mail them to cmcolive@cmworks.com with a short description of where the picture was taken. Do you use any of our products? Are they in your facility? Maybe you’ve seen our hoists used at concerts to hold up the lighting truss system or our chain and binders used to tie down products on truck trailers. Regardless of the use, we want to see our products in action.  WHERE’S YOUR CM?

This post was written by Stacie Wingfield, former Director of Marketing for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

ATEX-compliant Solution for Natural Gas Filter Change in Shimmering Heat

ATEX-compliant Solution for Natural Gas Filter Change in Shimmering Heat

Atex-compliant

For natural gas filter towers in the Saudi-Arabian desert, our German branch, Columbus McKinnon Engineered Products GmbH has developed and installed a special lifting and traversing system for changing filter elements. This involves the use of 19 specially designed trolleys in three different sizes and eight gantry cranes made from ATEX-compliant lifting elements and electric wire rope winches from Pfaff-silberblau. This extremely heavy-duty special solution is capable of withstanding temperatures of up to 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees F), sand and dust and even the explosive environment.

ATEX-compliant solution

The natural gas produced in the Saudi-Arabian desert is refined directly on site into a clean and effectively burning fuel by means of special filtration processes. The filter stations used for this process consist of two to four towers with an approximate diameter of three meters (9.84 ft) and a height of up to 24 meters (78.7 ft). These contain filter elements that have to be changed at regular intervals. The motion technology solution from Columbus McKinnon Engineered Products ensures that the covers on top of the towers (each weighing 16 US tons) can be safely lifted up and moved for access to the filters.

Mobile trolleys and cranes

Our engineers installed a crane for each filter station on 24 meter (78.7 ft) platforms. The cranes move on traversing rails over the towers, along with a trolley per tower, which is also moved on rails.

ATEX-compliant

During inspection, the dual drive trolley moves into position at the tower cover. The gantry crane, equipped with two BETA electric wire rope winches from Pfaff-silberblau, lifts the 16 ton cover and places it on the trolley where it is locked securely in place. The trolley and cover are moved away from the tower and the crane removes the contaminated filter.  Once the old filter is extracted, the crane travels to the area where it can be lowered to the ground. A new filter is hoisted and put into place.  The cover is moved back to the tower by means of the trolley and fastened securely.

Columbus McKinnon Engineered Products and the client worked together for nine months on planning and designing this system. The entire project from start to finish took one year to complete.

The wire rope winches and lifting elements from Pfaff-silberblau used in the Saudi Arabian natural gas refinery comply with the stringent category 2 requirements of the ATEX Directives 94/9/EC and 99/92/EC, which also govern equipment used for lifting, lowering, pushing and compressing loads in plant engineering, navigation, sewage treatment plants, and chemical and food processing industries.

Current information and checklists pertaining to ATEX-compliant motion technology products from Pfaff-silberblau are available online at www.pfaff-silberblau.com/AT-Brochures.

Many thanks to our German office,  Columbus McKinnon Engineered Products GmbH, for submitting this application story to our blog!

ICHC Presenter to Answer Audience Questions

ICHC Presenter to Answer Audience Questions

TomReardon_rev1 MCM Events welcomes another speaker at the jointly held Crane & Rigging Conference and Industrial Crane & Hoist Conference at the Hampton Inn Hotel & Suites New Orleans-Convention Center, New Orleans, La. The conferences will take place May 23-24, 2012. Tom Reardon, Training Manager, Hoists and Cranes, for Columbus McKinnon Corporation, will provide an overview of OSHA 1910.179, as well as explore crane configurations, regulations, and standards for the industry.
“Many of us have experienced the concern prompted by crane inspection reports listing discrepancies as OSHA violations. Not all of these reports are accurate,” says Reardon. “Some confusion exists among crane and hoist owners, users, and service providers regarding crane configurations and the application of OSHA 1910.179 regulations.”

Reardon is inviting industry stakeholders to submit questions regarding standards and regulations, to which he will source answers from ASME/ANSI, OSHA, CMAA, etc., and share them with delegates at the end of his presentation.

Do you have a question you would like answered? Take part in this survey.

button_register_today