Author: Gisela Clark

Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Going to USITT? Stop by and Visit Columbus McKinnon

Going to USITT? Stop by and Visit Columbus McKinnon

USITT

The 57th annual USITT Show kicks off next week.

The USITT show is the largest full production trade show in America, featuring 200 exhibitors and special exhibits from around the industry. USITT is the leader in life-long learning opportunities for the entertainment design and technology industry. The conference focuses on various workshops that help educate attendees on several aspects of theater.

This year’s conference will be held in St. Louis, Missouri, at America’s Center Convention Complex on March 7-11.

You can find CM Entertainment Technology (CM-ET) at Booth #731.

Stop by and see everything we have to offer, including new and industry-favorite products such as the:

Our sales and training teams will also be available to address your questions about any of our products.

While You’re Visiting USITT, Get Trained.

Check out this training opportunity during USITT. You still have time to register:

CM Lodestar RTC Motor Technician Certification School
taught by David Carmack, 
Entertainment Product Trainer, ETCP Recognized Trainer, IATSE TTF Recommended Trainer
This course counts toward 12 renewal credits for ETCP Certified Riggers.

Date & Time: March 7-8 (9:00 am-5:00 pm)
America’s Center Convention Complex
Location: TBD
LEARN MORE

Don’t miss an annual favorite “Stump the Rigger” featuring Herb Hart & Bill Sapsis on Saturday, March 11, from 11:00-12:30.

#CMLodestar

Please don’t be a stranger. Tell us what you enjoyed most about USITT this year by posting your comments and photos on our FacebookInstagram, and Twitter and using the hashtag #cmlodestar. Some of our new followers during the show will get a free CMET beanie cap! We would love to hear from you!

Gisela Clark
Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Our Most Popular Blog Posts of 2016

Our Most Popular Blog Posts of 2016

popular blog posts of 2016As we look back at 2016 and are busy planning for 2017, it’s interesting to see which of our blog topics were the most popular with our readers last year. With all of our blog posts, we look to provide you with valuable information to help keep you safe and make your job easier. We want to address your hottest questions, share interesting and unique application stories and offer how-to videos and tips that you can use in your day-to-day jobs.

We received a lot of comments and views on our stories and we are thrilled with your response!

So without further delay, here is the list of our top 10 most read Columbus McKinnon blog posts for 2016:

1. Forging vs. Casting: Which is Better?
2. Understanding the Difference Between Chain Grades and How They are Used
3. Nine Important Rules to Follow When Using Shackles
4. OSHA Update: Facts About the New Sling Regulations
5. The Low-Down on Chain Tie Downs
6. Should a Warning Device be Continuously on When the Bridge Crane is Traveling?
7. Does your Overhead Crane Meet OSHA Regulations?
8. Sling Selection & Working Load Limits: What You Need to Know
9. Shackle Markings, Materials and Appropriate Standards
10. Grounding of Overhead Crane Systems

While we’re at it, we thought we would share our most popular Safety Webinar ever. You can check it out here:

This is just one of the many safety webinars that we have presented over the last few years. If you are interested in receiving notifications for future safety webinars, you can subscribe here.

We want to take this time to thank you for reading our blog and sharing its messages across your various social media channels. Whether you’re a distributor or end user, we are grateful for all of your interest in our products and services. We look forward to connecting with you in 2017.

Gisela Clark
Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Going to LDI? Stop by and Visit Columbus McKinnon

Going to LDI? Stop by and Visit Columbus McKinnon

LDI

The 29th annual Live Design International (LDI) Show kicks off next week.

This year, LDI show organizers are expecting more than 12,000 attendees – representing 80 countries – who work in theater, concert halls, outdoor production venues, houses of worship, theme parks and a variety of other live entertainment venues. They are coming to LDI to see the latest and greatest products in action, get a refresher on industry knowledge, and visit with old friends. LDI expects more than 350 exhibitors providing live demos and many discussion opportunities about lighting, sound, projection and special effects equipment.

You can find CM Entertainment Technology (CM-ET) at Booth #1631.

Stop by and see everything we have to offer, including new and industry-favorite products such as the:

Our sales, product management and training teams will also be available to address your questions about any of our products.

While You’re Visiting, Get Trained.

Check Out These Two Training Classes During LDI. You still have time to register:

CM Lodestar RTC Motor Technician Certification School
taught by David Carmack

Date & Time: October 18-19 (9:30am-5:30pm)
Location: Room N220, Session Number L44
LEARN MORE

Los Motores CM Lodestar: En Espanol
taught by Oscar Calderon and Rosangel Garcia

Date & Time: October 20 (9:30am-5:30pm)
Location: Room N220, Session Number L45
LEARN MORE

A large number of CMCO representatives will be at our booth this year, including members of our North American Entertainment Technology team, CM-ET Training team, Sales and Channel Services.

Please don’t be a stranger. Tell us what you enjoyed most about LDI this year by posting your comments and photos on our Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. We would love to hear from you!

Gisela Clark
Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Summer Concert Series: Where is your CM Hoist?

Summer Concert Series: Where is your CM Hoist?

Who doesn’t love the summer time and seeing a great concert with your favorite band from the past or present? A few of our fans recently shared CM Hoist photos from summer concerts they’ve attended, which included a snapshot of our #CMLodestar motors.

For King and Country, CM Hoist
For King and Country performing at the Carowinds Paladium Ampitheatre in Charlotte, North Carolina.
CMA Music Festival, CM Hoist
CMA Music Festival in Nashville, Tennessee (Thank you Mountain Productions!)
CM Lodestar motors in Lisbon, Portugal, CM Hoist
Martin Audio’s MLA rig on world stage at Rock Festival in Lisbon, Portugal. (Thank you Tracy!)

Like us, they love seeing CM Hoist products in action!

We know that many of you have great things planned for this summer, so we are continuing our tradition of starting a 2016 photo album on Facebook to capture your photos of Columbus McKinnon products working hard at concerts and events around the world.

If you spot them being used, please snap a photo and share it with us on social media. We will post your pictures on our Facebook photo album and, each month, our fans (through likes!) will choose a lucky winner who will receive a box of some great CM promotional items!

There are many ways you can share your CM Hoist photos with us – choose your favorite channel!
Facebook
Instagram
Twitter: Industrial
Twitter: CM-Entertainment
Google+

Use the hashtags #CMLodestar and #wheresyourCM to join the conversation!

We look forward to seeing all of the wonderful concerts and places you will visit this summer!

Gisela Clark
Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
CMCO Distributor, REID Lifting, Proudly Sponsors the World’s Fastest Land Speed Record Attempt

CMCO Distributor, REID Lifting, Proudly Sponsors the World’s Fastest Land Speed Record Attempt

Bloodhound Supersonic Car
CMCO distributor, REID Lifting, sponsored the Bloodhound project with the donation of a bespoke gantry lifting system. Photo: Stefan Marjoram

The Bloodhound Supersonic Car (SSC) is set to become one of the world’s greatest engineering feats, capable of traveling at speeds over 1,000 mph. Started 8 years ago, the Bloodhound project is attempting to smash the current land speed record of 763 mph by Thrust SSC, the first land vehicle to break the sound barrier. When complete, the car will be powered by both a jet engine and a rocket to help it achieve super high speeds.

During construction of the Bloodhound Supersonic Car, it came as no surprise that Bloodhound chose to use a REID Lifting PORTA-GANTRY frame from CMCO Channel Partner, Reid Lifting. This tall and innovative gantry lifting system, with an integrated CMCO chain block, has helped Bloodhound carefully construct each element of the car.

Bloodhound Supersonic Car
Bloodhound, a supersonic car designed to go over 1,000 mph (1,600 km/h)

REID engineers also are working closely with Bloodhound to create a 3,000 kg WLL custom lifting solution that will be used for the supersonic car’s first record attempt in South Africa in 2017.  A custom solution is required due to the uneven surface and unique conditions of the Hakskeen Pan, the desert plain where the momentous record attempt will take place.

Bloodhound Supersonic Car
The science behind Bloodhound is now being used in activities in 7,500 schools in the UK.

Taking Science to the Classroom

The science behind Bloodhound is now being used in activities at more than 7,500 schools in the UK.
However, the real driver behind the project is to inspire future generations to pursue careers in STEM (Science, Engineering, Technology and Math). With this in mind, REID Lifting has chosen to not only sponsor the project with the donation of a bespoke gantry lifting system but is also involved in the Bloodhound SSC STEM Ambassador Program.

REID Lifting has sent Design Engineer, Luke Rossiter, and Machinist Apprentice, Tim Battersby, to local schools throughout South Wales and southwest England as official Bloodhound Ambassadors. Both having a strong interest in engineering, they will be sharing their passion for the project to encourage future generations to follow in their footsteps.

Thank you, REID Lifting, and our CMCO UK office for sharing this great story and being a part of such a stellar project.

Gisela Clark
Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Columbus McKinnon Associates Give Back to Local Communities

Columbus McKinnon Associates Give Back to Local Communities

Did you know that 31% of all charitable giving occurs during the month of December or that 12% of all giving during 2014 happened on the last three days of the year?

The holidays are a great reminder that we all have so much to be thankful for. One of the best ways to show gratitude is by giving back to our community and helping those who are less fortunate. Columbus McKinnon Associates are no strangers to this and give thousands of dollars in donations to help people locally.

Here are a few highlights from 2015. Click on each photo to learn more about the specific charity.

Long Reach Long Riders
Ken Tilson, an Associate from our facility in Damascus, Virginia, took a 7-day (450+ mile) ride with the Long Reach Long Riders, an organization that raises money for Behind the Scenes – An Initiative of The PLASA Foundation. This is the organization’s 12th charity ride.
Angel Tree Program
Our Ohio Associates (Lisbon and Salem plants) helped over 40 children in need through their Salvation Army Angel Tree program.
Wadesboro Primary School
Associates from CMCO’s facility in Wadesboro, North Carolina, partnered with the Wadesboro Primary School to donate non-perishable food items, gifts, clothing and school uniforms plus gift cards to support 22 needy children and their families.
Toys for Tots
Kim Hake, an employee from CES Material Handling, along with Duff-Norton Associates, volunteered and collected toys to donate to the U.S. Marine Corps’ Toys for Tots program.

 

 

Text Santa
Heading overseas, the CMCO Chester team, located in the United Kingdom, dressed up and spread some holiday cheer while making donations to “Text Santa,” a group that supports organizations like Make-a-Wish® UK, Macmillan Cancer Support and Save the Children.

Associates at our corporate office in Amherst, New York, actively supported a variety of organizations over the course of 2015.

Light The Night Walk
Amherst Associates participated in the LLS Light The Night Walk to raise money for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.
Corporate Challenge
They also walked and ran their way through the Corporate Challenge to raise money for local charities.

Make-A-Wish

In addition, each year, the Amherst team raises funds for a specific charity of their choice. This year, employees donated more than $10,000 to the Make-a-Wish® foundation.  The organization’s mission is to grant the wishes of children diagnosed with a life-threatening medical condition. CMCO’s donation went to support a child named Drew who has been diagnosed with sickle-cell disease.

Last but not least, accepting the #DogBiscuitChallenge from Uniland Development Company, CMCO’s very own Kurt Wozniak, Vice President – Americas, ate dog biscuits to benefit the SPCA, raising more than $700 for the organization. Watch Kurt eat all 7 dog biscuits in our video!

We are grateful to all of our Associates who have contributed their time and resources to such worthy causes. We wish you all a safe and happy holiday season!

Gisela Clark
Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Understanding Horsepower Ratings on Hoists

Understanding Horsepower Ratings on Hoists

horsepower ratings on hoists

Chris, an ETCP certified rigger and recent safety webinar attendee, asks the following question about horsepower ratings on hoists:

“I don’t see Columbus McKinnon hoists rated with horsepower, however they are sometimes referred to by that rating. Does that relate to the FPM capability? I am guessing that a faster FPM hoist would have to have a ‘stronger’ electric motor. Looking forward to your comments.”

Dave Carmack, Columbus McKinnon Entertainment Trainer, ETCP Recognized Trainer and recent safety webinar presenter, responds:

To answer this question, let’s take a look at the history of horsepower. When steam engines were invented, the designers wanted to know how much work the steam engines could do in comparison to a horse of that day. This is where the term horsepower originated.

Horsepower is a measurement of power at the rate at which work is done. When we measure the power of a horse, we see that one horse can do 33,000 foot pounds of work per minute.

Now, the question of horsepower is: I want to move an object from one place to another in a specific amount of time. How much effort (or power) will this take?

Looking at the Lodestar, this hoist can have a variety of different horsepower ratings, depending on the capacities and speeds. For example, take a look at the 1/2-ton Lodestar below:

1. ½ ton unit with a lifting speed of 8 fpm is a ¼ hp
2. ½ ton unit with a lifting speed of 16 fpm is ½ hp
3. ½ ton unit with a lifting speed of 32 fpm is 1 hp
4. ½ ton unit with a lifting speed of 64 fpm is 2 hp

We also need to consider the gear ratio and the type or size stator we use in the motor to accomplish how much weight and at what speed the hoist needs to work.

Want to learn more? View our Safety Webinar on: Frequently Asked Questions During our CM ET Motor Schools.

Gisela Clark
Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
#RigSafe Twitter Chat and Rigging Safety in the Entertainment Industry

#RigSafe Twitter Chat and Rigging Safety in the Entertainment Industry

Last Friday we held our October #rigsafe Safety Webinar, “10 Frequently Asked Questions from our CM Entertainment Motor Schools” featuring Dave Carmack, Columbus McKinnon Entertainment Trainer, and Eric Rouse, Technical Director for the Denver Center of Performing Arts. In case you missed it, you can view the recording here.

To continue the conversation with both Dave and Eric, we followed our webinar with our first ever Twitter Chat under the hashtag #rigsafe, a hashtag used to promote rigging safety in the entertainment industry, an initiative started by the United States Institute for Theatre Technology (USITT). Here are some of the highlights!

The chart below shows some of our most active participants in the #rigsafe Twitter Chat:

#rigsafe

https://twitter.com/OylerBob/status/652516958907273216

Our afternoon concluded with an email I received from one of our webinar participants, Bill Bradburn from Aerial Arts, with these Latin words in his email signature: SALUS SUMMUS OMNIA. He confirmed its meaning to be “Safety Above All/Safety Over Everything.” What a great motto for a rigging company! May we all live by this motto and incorporate it into everything we do.

A big thanks to everyone who participated in our events last week. We have more to come in 2016! #rigsafe

 

Gisela Clark
Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Reading RFID Chips on Rigging Equipment

Reading RFID Chips on Rigging Equipment

RFID chip

Mike, a Lead Rigging Technician for an equipment rental company in the entertainment industry and recent safety webinar attendee, asks:

“How far away should you be to read a RFID chip for rigging equipment tracking and inspection?”

Troy Raines, Columbus McKinnon Chain & Rigging Product Engineering Manager and safety webinar presenter, answers the RFID chip question:

This is an excellent and frequently asked question.  The simple answer is that it depends on the type of RFID chip being used in the product. For CM Smart ID, we chose a chip that would require the user to touch the reader to the chip. While this might seem inconvenient, the benefits far outweigh the disadvantages for the following two reasons:

  1. To properly inspect any piece of rigging hardware, the qualified person must actually handle it. It wouldn’t be safe or effective to “inspect” rigging hardware from any distance. There is too much risk that a minor issue could be overlooked until it became a more serious safety hazard.
  2. To effectively track inventory, it wouldn’t be accurate to accidently scan the wrong shackle because multiple shackles in the area could be read at the same time. The count would frequently be wrong because you wouldn’t know which shackles were and were not scanned.

Want to learn more? View our Safety Webinar on RFID: Simplifying Rigging Hardware Inspection and Tracking.

Gisela Clark
Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Are Chain ID Tags Required on Tie-Downs?

Are Chain ID Tags Required on Tie-Downs?

Brad recently asked the following question in response to a blog post The Low-Down on Chain Tie-Downs:

“I wrote to my distributor and inquired about chain tags. Their representative replied that all they had in stock were CHAIN TAGS even though they listed CHAIN and SLING tags made by CM.
They sent me their part number for what I think is a sling tag. Is it okay to use that tag for my Grade 100 chains that I’m using as tie downs? They are not slings, just chains. As I understand it, my Grade 100 chains have to be labeled to prevent a Grade 30 rating by roadside inspectors. Your advice would be appreciated!”

chain ID tags

Henry Brozyna, our Technical Instructor responds:

Thanks for reaching out to us on your question about chain ID tags.

When you contacted your distributor, they automatically assumed that the tag you requested was for a sling (either Grade 80 or 100), which is what prompted them to send you a sling tag. Slings must always be tagged; tie-downs do not.

Inspectors rely on the embossing on the chain to indicate the grade of that tie-down as well as to determine its working load limit. The standard states, that if the embossing is not legible, then the inspector will use the minimum grade for that chain size, which will be Grade 30.

For example: A driver knows his chains are Grade 80. He is using the appropriate number of tie-downs to properly secure the load. At roadside inspection, if the inspector cannot find any legible embossing on the chain, he will apply the Grade 30 rating. With that, the tie-downs can no longer be used. Now, the load does not have sufficient tie-downs to safely secure it during transport.

As for tags, the standard does not require them on tie-down chain, and it would be left to the discretion of the inspector to determine if it’s an acceptable substitution.

Why take the risk? The grade should be legible on the chain if it is being used. If the embossed grade is worn down, the chain should be replaced.
 

Gisela Clark
Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.