Author: Jon Walters

Jon Walters is a Senior Engineer, Sales Application & Technical Trainer for Magnetek -- a Columbus McKinnon company.
Does the Age of a Crane Prevent Installation of a Collision Avoidance System?

Does the Age of a Crane Prevent Installation of a Collision Avoidance System?

collision avoidance systemAl, a CMCO distributor salesman, trainer and recent safety webinar attendee, asks the following question about applying a collision avoidance system:

Does the age of a crane prevent it from having a collision avoidance system installed? 

Jon Walters, Magnetek trainer and safety webinar presenter, answers:

No. The age of a crane has no impact on whether a collision avoidance system can be incorporated, but there is some basic information that should be considered to ensure it is applied correctly.

Control Voltage

Confirm the necessary control voltage needed so the collision avoidance system can be matched to the existing control voltage. This ensures major changes will not be needed to existing crane control logic.  Magnetek’s collision avoidance systems are designed to operate with control voltages of 12-240 VAC or VDC.

Type of Existing Crane Control

Is it a contractor control, static stepless control or a variable frequency drive? Determining the existing control scheme defines how the output(s) from the collision avoidance system will be incorporated into the existing control logic. Older cranes may be operating with contactor controls, but still permit the installation of collision avoidance systems.

Type and Number of Crane Motions:

What crane motions will collision avoidance be applied to?  Motions may be:

  • Bridge to obstruction (such as a wall or no-go area)
  • Bridge to bridge
  • Trolley motion to end of travel on bridge
  • Trolley to trolley

The number of motions, along with any “no fly” zones, will determine the number of collision avoidance systems needed.

Distance

The distance at which a collision avoidance system will “trigger” is determined based on the distances and speeds of the traverse motions in accordance with what is deemed safe for a slowdown and stop function.

The above factors will help determine the configuration of a collision avoidance system that can be added to your crane, which, again, may be implemented regardless of crane age.

Want to learn more? View our recent safety webinar!

Jon Walters
Jon Walters is a Senior Engineer, Sales Application & Technical Trainer for Magnetek -- a Columbus McKinnon company.
Does the Age of a Crane Prevent Installation of a Radio Remote Control?

Does the Age of a Crane Prevent Installation of a Radio Remote Control?

radio remote controlAl, a CMCO distributor salesman, trainer and recent safety webinar attendee, asked the following question about applying a radio remote control:

Does the age of a crane prevent it from having a radio remote control installed?

Jon Walters, Magnetek trainer and safety webinar presenter, answers:

No, the age of a crane has no impact on whether a radio remote control can be incorporated.  There is some basic information that should be considered to determine the proper style of radio remote control and ensure it is applied correctly:

Control voltage:

Confirming the radio receiver voltage can be matched to the existing control voltage ensures no significant alterations are required to the crane.

In addition to standard AC control voltages, all Magnetek radio remote controls are adaptable to the most common DC voltage control voltages – 12/24/48/250.

Type of existing crane control:

Is it a contactor control, static stepless control, or a variable frequency drive? Determining the existing control scheme allows for the selection of the optimal radio control product. Older cranes may be operating with contactor controls, but still permit the installation of radio remote control.

The number of motions on the crane:

Is it a basic three-motion (bridge/trolley/hoist) crane or does it perform more or fewer motions? This will dictate how many crane motion outputs are needed on the receiver.

Transmission distance:

Is there a range limitation or is an extended range needed? The transmission distance is based on the crane application.  For example, in situations where the transported material is very delicate, precise positioning is critical. This requires the crane operator or spotters to be in close proximity to the load and range limitation would be advisable. If the crane is operating in a long runway with no obstructions and no areas are deemed unsafe, then an extended range may be considered.

The above factors will help determine the style of radio remote control you can add to your crane, which may be implemented regardless of crane age.

Want to learn more? View our recent safety webinar!

Jon Walters
Jon Walters is a Senior Engineer, Sales Application & Technical Trainer for Magnetek -- a Columbus McKinnon company.