Category: Hoists – Powered

Yale Hoist Used in Raising of Hazelmere Dam Wall in South Africa

Yale Hoist Used in Raising of Hazelmere Dam Wall in South Africa

Hazelmere Dam
The design has subsequently been changed to incorporate an uncontrolled spillway in the form of a “Piano Key Weir.”

Last year, the North Coast Region of South Africa experienced a drought that exposed the inadequacies of the region’s current water storage. As part of an intervention to address this issue and the growing demands of the North Coast Region, the Department of Water Affairs decided to look at ways to improve the dam located on the Mdloti River. This was a giant task!

The Hazelmere Dam, located on the Mdloti River, was originally constructed as a concrete gravity dam in 1976.

The design has subsequently been changed to incorporate an uncontrolled spillway in the form of a “Piano Key Weir,” commonly referred to as a PKW structure.

Hazelmere Dam
A Yale CPE 10-ton electric chain hoist was used to set up the tensioning head of the steel wire cables.

To stabilize the wall of this dam, steel wire cables needed to be anchored in the rock surrounding the dam wall. To do this, CMCO Durban was asked to supply and install a Yale CPE 10-ton electric chain hoist. This hoist would be used to set up the tensioning head of the steel wire cables.

Once this project is complete, the dam wall will be increased by 7 meters (23 feet) and will raise the dam’s capacity from 23.9 million cubic meters (844 million cubic feet) to 43.7 million cubic meters (1543 million cubic feet).

Trevor Herbert

Trevor Herbert is the General Manager for our CMCO Material Handling division in South Africa.

3 Safety Tips When Installing Your CM Trolley

3 Safety Tips When Installing Your CM Trolley

Whether it’s a hoist, trolley or rigging equipment, proper use, inspection and maintenance is important to ensure operator safety at all times. Operators of material handling equipment should adhere to the manufacturer’s installation, inspection and maintenance requirements outlined in the product’s operation and maintenance manual (O&M manual).

Beam clamps and trolleys are critical components of a complete lifting system and demand the same attention to safety as hoists and below-the-hook rigging. The following three safety tips are important to consider when installing and inspecting a CM Series 633 Trolley.

1. Consider the flange and shape of the I-beam to ensure proper fit and clearance. Measure the I-beam flange and check the distance between track wheel flanges. This distance should be 1/8 to 3/16 inch greater than the beam flange width for a straight runway. Additional clearance may be required for the trolley to negotiate track sections with curves. This clearance should be kept to a minimum to ensure the trolley operates properly on both the straight track sections and the curved track sections.

CM trolley
2. Ensure the equalizer pin nuts have been installed properly, in accordance with the O&M manual recommendations. The pins should be tight and locked into position. These nuts should be regularly inspected to ensure they are tight and secure during your periodic inspections, which can be monthly or yearly depending on service. Refer to your O&M manual and ASME B30.17.

CM trolley
Ensure the equalizer pin nuts have been installed properly.


3. It is recommended that the trolley is mounted to the hoist prior to final installation onto the beam.
Follow the washer and spacer instructions in your O&M manual to properly set the trolley based on the application’s beam flange width.

Please note: washer and spacer arrangement recommendations shown in the O&M manual are affected by structural variations. The accuracy of the final adjustment should be verified by the installer to ensure proper clearance is achieved between the trolley wheel flanges and the toe of the runway beam.
CM trolley

Remember, any trolley installation should always be done in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions or the recommendations of a qualified person. Improper installation can cause unequal loading on the trolley and side beam and, as a result, can cause the trolley to fall from the beam. It is also recommended that a load test is performed to 100-125% of the rated capacity of the crane after installation.

At Columbus McKinnon, the safe and proper use of material handling products is important to us. We encourage all operators to periodically review the manufacturer’s operation and maintenance manuals for any equipment that they use. You can find the O&M manual for the CM Series 633 Trolley, as well as other hoist and rigging products, at www.cmworks.com/library.

Peter Cooke

Peter Cooke is a Training Manager specializing in Rigging & Load Securement for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

Top 7 Benefits of Using Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) to Control Your Crane or Hoist

Top 7 Benefits of Using Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) to Control Your Crane or Hoist

Variable Frequency DrivesVariable frequency drives, or VFDs, are a type of AC motor controller that drive an electric motor by varying the frequency and voltage supplied to it. VFDs are also commonly known as variable speed or adjustable speed drives, AC drives, micro-drives or inverters – depending on the industry or application.

In the material handling industry, variable frequency drive controls are often used in electric hoists as well as in overhead cranes and lifting systems. Drives are designed around a microprocessor, which allows for the creation of programmable functions for specific applications.

So, what are the benefits of using a VFD to control your hoist or crane?

1. Greater Speed Adjustment: VFD controls let you choose from multiple speeds, allowing you to customize your hoist controls to your application.

2. Improved Load Control: Positioning a load using a single-speed hoist may cause shock loading or load swings. A VFD allows for smooth operation by gradually slowing down a load. Variable frequency drives also allow for smooth acceleration to prevent load swings in the traverse motions.

3. Duty Cycles: CMAA Class A-F. A VFD is concisely matched with a braking resistor, depending on the duty cycle of the motion. A regenerative drive may also be used, which is not dependent on duty cycle.

4. Efficiency: A VFD will only consume the power that’s needed, thus saving energy compared to contactors and soft-starters.

5. Increased Hoist Life: Some variable frequency drives provide thermal overload and overcurrent protection for the hoist motor, prolonging its life. VFDs also utilize a ramp-down-to-stop method of braking rather than using brake shoes to slow down. The brake is only used for parking and emergency situations, which prolongs brake life.

6. Regenerative Energy: Deceleration and lowering of a hoist creates regenerative energy produced by the motor. This energy can be transformed into heat using a braking resistor or conditioned and send back to the source, thus netting energy savings. An AC regenerative drive will redistribute that energy, which would otherwise be wasted when converted to heat with a braking resistor.

7. Digital Diagnostics: Aid in maintenance and troubleshooting on the machine or remotely.

Magnetek VFDs are designed for crane and hoist applications with various performance and safety features. A few of these features include:

1. Safe Torque Off: Provides a redundant hardware safety circuit that guarantees motor and brake power are removed when an E-STOP switch or safety controller opens the drive input, eliminating the need for external disconnects.

2. Torque Proving: The motor is pre-torqued to guarantee that the load can be held before opening the brake.

3. Load Check: Continuously checks for hoist overloads and prevents the hoist from lifting when an overload condition is detected.

4. Brake Checks: Monitors the opening and closing of a brake to ensure that it is safe and healthy.

5. Micro-Speed: Allows the operator to make slow, precise movements.

6. Electronic Programmable Limit Switches: Allows slow down and stop limits without physically geared limit switches.

To learn more about variable frequency drives, watch our safety webinar.

Casey Cummins

Casey Cummins is a Controls Product Manager for Magnetek — a Columbus McKinnon company.

Answers to Your Top 7 Crane and Hoist Questions

Answers to Your Top 7 Crane and Hoist Questions

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During the hundreds of classes Columbus McKinnon’s training team has conducted over the years, there are a variety of questions that arise regarding the use, maintenance and inspection of overhead cranes and hoists. So, I wanted to take this opportunity to outline seven of the most common concerns, myths and misconceptions we’ve received from crane and hoist operators and technicians during our classes.

1. Question: Do monorails need to be labeled with their rated load?

Answer: According to ASME B30.11, rated load markings are not required on monorails but are recommended. Before marking the monorail, a qualified person must determine the rated load on the monorail beam. Once the monorail is marked, the rating should be legible from the ground floor. ASME’s recommendation also applies to marking the rated loads of hoists on the monorail. For more information on hoist marking guidelines, see ASME B30.16.

2. Question: Can rated loads for hoists and trolleys be different from the crane’s rated load?

Answer: The short answer to your question is “yes.” However, ASME B30.16 stipulates that when a system is comprised of components with different rated capacities, the rated load of the “system” shall be based on the lowest rated individual component.
System is defined as the combination of Monorail, Hoist and Trolley in the case of a Monorail and Crane; Hoist and Trolley in the case of an Underhung Crane.

ASME B30.16-1.3.2 states that the supporting structure, including trolleys, monorail, or crane, shall be designed to withstand the loads and forces imposed by the hoist for the rated load.

3. Question: Are yearly load tests required on a hoist and crane?

Answer: There is no specific time period during which load tests must be performed once the initial installation is inspected and load tested. Some states require operators to load test hoists and cranes every four years, but, in most cases, if the hoist is not altered, repaired or modified, it can remain in service indefinitely without a load test being required.

4. Question: Are monthly records of inspection required for hoists, wire rope, chain and hooks?

Answer: This depends on the type of crane. OSHA regulation 1910.179 applies to top-running overhead and gantry cranes with top-running trolley hoists. For these types of cranes, monthly inspections of the hoist’s chain, wire rope and hooks are required with a recorded certification. This certification record must include the signature of the person who performed the inspection and the identifier of the chain, wire and hook that was inspected. If a hoist and trolley are underhung, frequent inspections are required, but written documentation is not.

5. Question: Do you have to be certified to inspect and repair hoists and cranes?

Answer: According to ASME standards, you must be a “qualified person” to inspect and repair cranes and hoists. A “qualified person” is a person who, by possession of a recognized degree or certificate of professional standing, or who, by extensive knowledge, training and experience, has successfully demonstrated the ability to solve or resolve problems relating to the subject matter and work. These individuals do not have to be professional engineers.

6. Question: Do you need to disassemble hoists for yearly inspections?

Answer: Hoist disassembly is not always required for yearly inspections. What is found during the inspection typically determines how far you need to break down the hoist. Be sure to reference the manufacturer’s OEM manual when disassembling any hoist.

7. Question: Do chain slings require latches on hooks?

Answer: According to OSHA 1910.184 and ASME B30.9, slings do not require latches on the hooks, unlike hoist and crane hooks where latches are required unless they constitute a hazard.

To learn more, check out our Safety Webinar covering these same questions. I hope you find this information useful when using, repairing or inspecting overhead hoists and cranes.

Christie Lagowski

Christie Lagowski is a Communications Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

Using Cranes and Hoists in Hazardous Areas Part 2: The Need for Corrosion Resistance

Using Cranes and Hoists in Hazardous Areas Part 2: The Need for Corrosion Resistance

Refinery 1Refinery 2

This article is Part 2 of a 3-part blog series that will provide an overview of safe practices for the use of material handling equipment in hazardous environments. Today, we’ll discuss the need for corrosion resistance.

As we established in Part 1 of this series, lifting equipment used in classified hazardous locations must be compliant with NEC, IEC or other applicable standards. Care should also be taken to ensure mechanical spark resistance for critical components, such as load blocks, hooks, trolley wheels, load brake and lifting mediums like chain and wire rope, in these locations. In addition to spark resistance, corrosion protection for lifting equipment is equally important in these environments to ensure the safety of personnel, equipment and the facility itself.

First, it should be noted that many classified hazardous areas exist outdoors, exposing lifting equipment to direct and often harsh weather. This includes applications such as offshore oil platforms, natural gas processing plants and refineries – to name a few. Specifically in offshore facilities, equipment may be exposed to splash zones, salt spray and the condensation of salt-laden air. In addition to harsh and corrosive weather conditions, sulfur, mineral acids and other corrosive agents are often present in the crude oil and natural gas that is being produced, processed and transported in these facilities, working to further corrode lifting equipment used in these environments.

Corroded pipe Refinery 3The total cost of corrosion can be tremendous, adding up to billions of dollars each year in the oil and gas industry alone. For these companies, the cost of repairing and replacing corroded lifting equipment paired with unscheduled maintenance, downtime and lost production can have a major impact on their profitability. In addition, corroded load blocks, hooks, chains and cables can result in catastrophic equipment failure. Not only can this cause costly damage to equipment and the facility, but most importantly, it can injure or even kill operators and other individuals in the facility.

Chain rusty iron rope

So how do you protect lifting equipment from corrosion?

The use of corrosion-resistant materials for load blocks, hooks, chains, cables and other components is critical. And, since surface corrosion can increase the friction between mating components, corrosion prevention can also be important in maintaining mechanical spark resistance when using these products in classified hazardous environments.
Columbus McKinnon offers a variety of solutions for these challenges, in the form of a wide range lifting products with spark and corrosion resistant materials and coatings. We also offer application engineering assistance to help you determine the right solution for your application. Choose from specially engineered products with:

  • Solid bronze hooks, bottom blocks and trolley wheels
  • Lightweight aluminum housings
  • Stainless steel load and hand chain
  • Multi-coat epoxy finishes
  • Zinc-aluminum corrosion-resistant finish

In addition to corrosion-resistant materials and finishes, we also suggest proper hoist lubrication to prevent sparking. These measures, combined with a robust inspection and preventative maintenance program that includes pre-lift inspections, play a critical role in ensuring the dependability and safe operation of lifting equipment in these harsh environments.

Regardless of your industry or where you do business. Columbus McKinnon has the hoists and cranes to keep your people, materials and equipment safe in hazardous areas. Learn more about our corrosion-resistant products:

Additional Resources:
Using Cranes and Hoists in Hazardous Areas Part 1: The Need for Spark Resistance

Joe Runyon

Joe Runyon is a Vertical Market Specialist for Oil & Gas at Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

Do You Need to Load Test When You Replace the Wire Rope in an Underhung Hoist?

Do You Need to Load Test When You Replace the Wire Rope in an Underhung Hoist?

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Richard, a recent safety webinar attendee, asks:

“Do you need to load test when you replace the wire rope in an underhung hoist?”

Peter Cooke, CMCO Training Manager and Safety Webinar presenter, answers:

The replacement of wire rope or chain for underhung hoists is specifically excluded from load test requirements. The wire rope should have already been tested by the manufacturer during the production process. The technician should perform a test without a load to check lifting and lowering function, brake operation and to check limiting devices. Reference ASME B30.16 for further details.

Some wire rope manufacturers recommend breaking in the rope. After installing the rope and starting with a light load (based on manufacturer’s recommendations), run through 20-25 lifting and lowering cycles at a reduced speed, gradually increasing the weight up to full capacity, if possible. This will allow the rope to adjust and properly seat itself. After this break-in procedure, secure the hook block and disconnect the rope end to relax or correct any possible torque or twists developed during the new installation and break in.

Want to learn more about Wire Rope Inspection and Maintenance of Underhung Hoists? Check out our recent safety webinar for yourself:

Gisela Clark

Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

Columbus McKinnon now Better Equipped to Support Customers in Asia

Columbus McKinnon now Better Equipped to Support Customers in Asia

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Columbus McKinnon China officially opened its new facility in Hangzhou, China, on August 21, 2014. Many of our valued customers and distributors witnessed the event, alongside nearly 200 CMCO Asia Associates.

Columbus McKinnon invested $6.4 million in the new facility. This investment will enable a 40% increase in capacity and give us the ability to manufacture additional western-designed products in China such as Global King wire rope hoists for the Asia-Pacific region.

Besides capacity improvements, Columbus McKinnon established the first regional Endurance Test Center in the new Hangzhou facility. This facility enables us to shorten the time to market for products designed in Asia.

At the facility’s grand opening event, Tim Tevens explained that “For 140 years, Columbus McKinnon Corporation has focused on continually exploring ways to grow and strengthen our company. We have made investments around the world to broaden our reach into markets that require safe and productive lifting of heavy loads. From continent to continent, we have established a meaningful presence and competed to be the best in those markets. Along the way, we have also developed capable products to help our customers work safely and productively.”

For CMCO China, the opening of this new facility is a significant milestone and marks a new era for the region. The bigger, more modern facility improves our production processes, boosts CMCO’s corporate presence in the region and allows us to better service our customers throughout the Asia Pacific market.

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Christie Lagowski

Christie Lagowski is a Communications Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

Is Your Material Handling Equipment Tough Enough for Arctic Environments?

Is Your Material Handling Equipment Tough Enough for Arctic Environments?

arctic environments arctic environments

With increasing demand for the exploration and production of natural resources in North Dakota, Alaska and other northern regions in the U.S. and Canada, there is a growing need for cranes and lifting equipment that can withstand exposure to ultra-cold temperatures. When selecting and specifying these products, careful consideration must be given to site conditions that could affect the safety and use of these heavy-duty lifting devices.

Choosing the correct hoists, cranes or rigging products for an application is always critically important due to the inherent risks involved in overhead lifting.

If specified incorrectly, the potential for costly equipment damage, personal injury and lost productivity resulting from failure of overhead lifting equipment can be very significant. While reputable manufacturers of lifting equipment utilize sound engineering, quality materials and have safety factors designed into their equipment, it is important to note that most manufacturers’ standard capacity ratings and duty classes do not take into account the impact that extreme cold temperatures can have on structural steel and other construction materials. This fact is borne out in a variety of industry standards.
Some of these include:

  • ASME (The American Society of Mechanical Engineers) ASME HST-2-1999 Performance Standard for Hand Chain Manually Operated Chain Hoists states “The hoists and trolleys covered by this Standard are intended for industrial use in ambient temperatures from 0° F (-18° C) to 130° F (54° C).”
  • ASME HST-1-1999 Performance Standard for Electric Chain Hoists and ASME HST-4 Performance Standard for Overhead Electric Wire Rope Hoists both state “hoist equipment is designed to operate in ambient temperatures between 0° F (-18° C) and 104° F (40° C).”
  • DNV Standard for Certification No. 2.22 Lifting Appliances, June 2013 states that for shipboard/industrial cranes (including derrick crane, gantry crane, overhead traveling crane, knuckle boom cranes) if not otherwise specified a design temperature of -10° C (14° F) shall be applied. This is a reference temperature to be used as a criterion for the selection of steel grades.
  • ASME B30.20 Below the Hook Lifting Devices states that additional considerations need to be taken if the working temperature is outside the range of -4 degrees C to 66 degrees C. It suggests that engineers either de-rate the capacity or use steel that is better suited for low temperature service.

The Impact of Cold on Steel and other Construction Materials

These and other standards reinforce the point that “standard” lifting equipment may not be suitable for use in extreme cold. The temperature limitations set forth in these documents may vary slightly from one standard to another, but they all recognize that temperature can negatively affect the safe working capacity of lifting equipment.
Cold temperatures can adversely affect the tensile toughness of many commonly used materials. Tensile toughness is a measure of a material’s brittleness or ductility. Ductile materials can absorb a significant amount of impact energy before fracturing, resulting in deformations (bending) that can alert the operator to an overload situation before a failure occurs. Brittle materials, on the other hand, can shatter on impact. Many materials experience a shift from ductile to brittle if the temperature drops below a certain point. The temperature at which this shift occurs is commonly known as the “ductile-to-brittle-transition” temperature (DBTT). Any brittle failure will be catastrophic and the failure will not necessarily be predictable. It can occur from a random impact, dynamic loading or can propagate out of a stress riser such as a crack or nick.

The Effect of Cold on Other Components

In addition to the effects of cold on steel and other construction materials, we must also consider the suitability of items such as motors, control components, hydraulic fluids, gear box lubricants and welding in these environments. It is important to consider the minimum ambient temperatures that may be present in the location that the hoist, crane or rigging will be used. Cold can cause some oil to become so thick that it cannot be pumped or be relied on as a “splash lubricant”. Grease can become stiff and solidify, causing grease-lubricated rotating parts to seize up.

Ensure Safety when Selecting Lifting Equipment for Arctic Environments

Reading and understanding applicable safety standards and consulting with experienced and reputable equipment manufacturers are two important steps in ensuring operator and facility safety when selecting hoists, cranes and rigging equipment for cold temperature applications.

  • Columbus McKinnon offers cranes, hoists, trolleys and rigging hardware designed and manufactured to order in North America, rather than being mass produced and warehoused. Many of these products lend themselves to modification and substitution of materials, allowing the equipment to be tailored to a specific application. Our Application Engineers are available to work with customers to determine the correct equipment, special componentry and any required design modifications based on a customer’s operating environment, capacity, and service requirements.
  •  Chester Hoist and Yale Cable King hoists, trolleys and crane components can be offered with special cold temperature steels, heated control enclosures, gear box heaters, artic-duty motors, low-temperature lubricants, special material certification (Charpy’s V- Notch ), material traceability reports, NDT of load bearing welds, and certificate of suitability for arctic duty (includes minimum temperature rating).
  •  CM DNV Shackles and DNV Master Sub- Assemblies are certified to meet DNV standards for Offshore Container Specifications and comply with DNV Lifting Appliances Requirements. These products also exceed Charpy’s V-notch impact strength of 42 Joules at -20°C (31 ft-lb at -4°F) as per DNV 2.7-1.

Working with Columbus McKinnon Application Engineers to address your low-temperature equipment needs, along with adhering to proper maintenance procedures and operator training, should allow for safe and uninterrupted operation of hoists and cranes even during periods of extreme cold. Be sure to take into consideration the specific stresses that cold-temperatures put on heavy-duty lifting products to keep your workers safe and prevent dangerous accidents on your worksites.

Joe Runyon

Joe Runyon is a Vertical Market Specialist for Oil & Gas at Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

Taking Entertainment Rigging Training to New Heights

Taking Entertainment Rigging Training to New Heights

 

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In the entertainment industry, rigging can be both a challenging and dangerous task. To help provide entertainment professionals with hands-on rigging experience, Robert Lannon of RPL Building Services, LLC, kicked off his first Rigging Climbing Camp in June of this year. Sponsored by Atlanta Rigging Systems and held at Southeastern Rope Access Training Facilities in Atlanta, Georgia, the three-day course was designed to teach basic climbing, rigging and aerial platform operation to entertainment professionals to prepare them for real-world rigging scenarios.

“Most of the riggers I know had no training whatsoever the first time they stepped out on a beam, pulled a point or drove a lift,” said Dave Gittens of Atlanta Rigging Systems. “The first place a rigger performs any of those tasks should not be in an arena roof structure. That was the motivation for this class.”

Twelve entertainment professionals attended the camp, including myself and CMCO’s Entertainment Business Development Specialist, Jennifer O’Leary. We kicked off the training by first discussing personal protective equipment, including harnesses, lanyards and helmets, as well as fall protection, structure climbing and beam walking. We also learned rope access techniques, including ascending, changeovers, descending and edge negotiations.

Other critical skills covered during the hands-on training included:

  • Utilizing motor control systems
  • Moving trusses
  • Rope management
  • Rescue pick offs from a structure
  • Aerial platform operation, including scissor and boom lifts

Using a 30 foot truss supplied by Atlanta Rigging, we pulled together everything we learned to conduct beam walks, climb a wire rope ladder, use horizontal life lines and rappel from the top of the structure. As we got more comfortable navigating the structure, product and tasks, you could see everyone push themselves and gain confidence in their skills.

Columbus McKinnon rigging training is a perfect complement to Rigging Climbing Camp, educating attendees on rigging fundamentals, safety practices, regulations and inspection techniques. When paired with the hands-on experience provided by the Rigging Climbing Camp, entertainment professionals will have a well-rounded understanding of proper rigging practices as well as real-life rigging situations and challenges encountered at entertainment venues.

To see our full selection of material handling products for the entertainment industry, visit www.cm-et.com.

Ken Tilson

Ken Tilson is our Entertainment Vertical Market Specialist at Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

Yale Cable King Hoist Helps Turn Grapes Into Wine

Yale Cable King Hoist Helps Turn Grapes Into Wine

Winery Hoist 1

The Wine Industry may seem like a glamorous business, but taking a grape from the vineyard and transforming it into your favorite wine is no easy feat. Just ask HECO Pacific Manufacturing.

HECO is a California-based crane manufacturing company that specializes in the production of turnkey winery hoist systems. HECO has built systems for some of the largest wineries in California and Washington. Their standard configurations range from 5 to 10 ton capacity and come with HECO’s trolley system. These systems utilize our heavy-duty Yale Cable King wire rope hoists together with a right angle mounted trolley with modifications for outdoor service.

Winery Hoist 2 Winery Hoist 3

The Application
So how are these systems being used? HECO’s winery hoisting systems are used to move large vats of freshly picked grapes to the crushing machine. Once in place, the hoists are used to tilt the vat and pour the grapes into the crushing mechanism. This is no easy task – just look at the size!

Knowing your Environment
At Columbus McKinnon, we often speak about the importance of knowing the environment where your product is used. These systems are being used outdoors in an earthquake-prone area, which can make for unique operating conditions. HECO knows these conditions well and designed its systems to meet the latest Seismic Zone 4 requirements (for earthquakes) as well as ANSI B 30.11 safety standards.

We are always on the search for unique applications like this one where our products are being used. Please contact me if you have an application story to share.

Gisela Clark

Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.