How Much is Enough when it Comes to Annual Inspection

How Much is Enough when it Comes to Annual Inspection

Q-&-A-chat_15A

Bill writes:

I keep running into the question “How do we complete the annual PM (preventative maintenance) per the manual unless we open up the gear box and inspect the internals?”  This question is centered around the annual inspection task to inspect “Load Bearing Parts.” 

Item 3 on the annual inspection of a CEW Hoist states: LOAD BEARING PARTS:  CHECK FOR WORN, CRACKED OR DISTORTED PARTS, SUCH AS SUSPENSION HOUSINGS, OUTRIGGERS, CLEVISES, YOKES, HOOK BLOCKS, SUSPENSION BOLTS, SHAFTS, LOCKING DEVICES AND BEARINGS ON HOIST (ALSO ON TROLLEY, IF SO EQUIPPED)

Some crane millwrights feel that to complete this task they need to open up the gearbox and inspect the gears and shafts within the gearbox.  How does Yale interpret this task?  Is there a time frequency when Yale would recommend inspection of the internals of the gearbox?

inspection tagTom answers:

We encounter this question frequently while conducting our inspection and maintenance training classes.

The ASME B30.16 defines load bearing / load suspension parts as follows; “the load suspension parts of the hoist are the means of suspension (hook or lug), the structure or housing that supports the drum or load sprocket, the drum or load sprocket, the rope or load chain, the sheaves or sprockets, and the load block or hook.”

Brakes, load and holding, gearing, motors, etc. are mechanical parts. They are part of the drive train.

ASME B30.16-2.1.3(b) states, “Covers and other items normally supplied to allow inspection of components should be opened or removed.”

In Table 2 of ASME B30.16, required inspection items are prefaced with “Evidence of.” 

There are several indirect ways of checking for and detecting (finding “evidence of”) excessive wear or abnormal operation of internal parts. If gearbox oil is not degraded, there are no metallic particles attached to the drain plug, the hoist raises and lowers properly (with and without a load), and there are no strange or abnormal sounds from the gearbox, it is unlikely that serious problems exist. If this inspection causes suspicion, refer to ASME B30.16-2.1.3(c)A designated person shall determine whether conditions found during inspection constitute a hazard and whether disassembly is required.”

I hope this answers your questions.  We cover this topic and many others in our Inspection and Crane & Hoist maintenance schools.  Please visit the CMCO Training website for more information.

Tom Reardon

Tom Reardon is a Technical Instructor specializing in Hoists & Overhead Cranes for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

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2 Replies to “How Much is Enough when it Comes to Annual Inspection”

  1. Tim,
    Yours is an excellent question to which there is no simple answer. A Frequent Inspection could very well turn into a Periodic Inspection based on the findings.

    There are many types of cranes and hoists. Each has an ASME B30 Standard that applies. Overhead and gantry cranes fall under the purview of ASME B30.2 and OSHA 1910.179. These standards outline the minimum requirements of Frequent Inspections (daily to monthly intervals) and Periodic Inspections (1 to 12 month intervals).

    In accordance with the ASME Standards B30.2, B30.11, B30.16, Sections (2-1) and OSHA 1910.179, Frequent Inspections certainly include, but are not necessarily limited to, the hooks and latches, wire rope or hoist chain, wire rope or hoist chain reeving, braking system, limit switch(s), functional operating mechanisms, tanks, valves, pumps, lines and other parts of air or hydraulic systems for leakage. Based on the findings of this process, a more in-depth, detailed inspection may be warranted.

    These same standards outline the minimum requirements for Periodic Inspections, which shall include the items listed under Frequent Inspections in addition to all items listed in the following paragraphs of the OSHA 1910.179 Regulations and appropriate ASME Standards.
    OSHA 1910.179(j)(3) Overhead and Gantry Cranes
    ASME B20.2-2.1.3 Overhead and Gantry Cranes
    ASME B30.11-2.1.3 Monorails and Underhung Cranes
    ASME B30.16-2.1.3 Overhead Hoists Underhung

    A periodic Inspection is a very detailed evaluation of the entire crane or hoist system. It must include, but is not necessarily limited to, the structure, gears, brake parts, fasteners, pins, shafts locking and clamping devices, bearings, electrical parts, runways, wheels, bumpers, stops, etc…

    We offer a comprehensive Crane and Hoist Inspection & Certification class addressing all of these issues, regulations, standards and specifications.
    Please visit http://www.cmcodepot.com for more information.

    Thank you again for your question. It is indeed a good one.

  2. We are currently doing monthly inspections for a customer, what would you not check on monthly inspections that you would on annual inspections? Trying to find out the difference between the two. Thanks Tim

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