Recommendations for Skewing Issues on an Overhead Crane

Recommendations for Skewing Issues on an Overhead Crane

Daniel, a salesperson for a Columbus McKinnon Channel Partner and recent safety webinar attendee, asks:

“On my overhead crane, the rail to flange contact is opposite end-to-end of the end truck. On one end truck, the drive wheel to the flange is on the inside and on the other wheel, the contact is on the outside. What are your recommendations for dealing with these skewing issues in this situation?”

skewing issues

Tom Reardon, Columbus McKinnon Technical Instructor and Safety Webinar Presenter, answers this question on skewing issues:

I gather from the question the crane is traveling in an orientation similar to the above example. This situation is not commonly caused by the runway. It is most often related to the crane.

If the crane is an A1 “type” drive configuration (see graphic below) some of the possible causes are:

  • Drive shaft couplings are defective/sloppy/loose
  • Weight/load is being carried at one extreme or the other on the bridge (trolley to the left or right of bridge)
  • Crane bridge is out of square
  • End trucks are bent or warped
  • Drive wheels are not “truly parallel.” This means the perpendicular center line of the left side drive wheel is not the same line as the perpendicular center line of the right side drive wheel.
  • Drive wheel diameters are not matched within CMAA Specification #70

If the crane is an A4 “type” drive configuration some of the possible causes are:

  • Weight/load is being carried at one extreme or the other on the bridge (trolley to the left or right of bridge)
  • Crane bridge is out of square
  • End trucks are bent or warped
  • Drive wheels are not “truly parallel.” This means the perpendicular center line of the left side drive wheel is not the same line as the perpendicular center line of the right side drive wheel
  • Drive wheel diameters are not matched within CMAA Specification #70
  • Bridge drive motors are not producing same output speed, starting torque, etc.

skewing issues

 

In case you missed our Safety Webinar “Identifying Tracking Problems with Cranes,” you can view it here.

Tom Reardon

Tom Reardon is a Technical Instructor specializing in Hoists & Overhead Cranes for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

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6 Replies to “Recommendations for Skewing Issues on an Overhead Crane”

  1. Very informative and useful post here. I knew something about skewing issues of cranes from your blog post and thanks for sharing.

  2. Hi Mike,
    You must contact the hoist manufacturer or reference their maintenance manual for steps to be taken. What you have mentioned could be the issue along with improper reeving, etc. It is always best to go by the manufacturer’s recommendations first.

    Tom

  3. I have a question on the actions that should/must be taken in the event hoist rope shaking is observed on a double girder 10 ton over head crane? I know that the issues could be caused by upper or lower block problems, dry hoisting rope issues, or an electrical issue. But no where do I find the actions that should be taken.

  4. I thought it was interesting that a crane bridge could be out of square. That can cause unbalanced work and can make the crane a danger to everyone near it. Anytime a crane is used there should be a certain depth of maintenance that is done to ensure that the machine is running at its best.

  5. Thanks for addressing the skewing of cranes. I’m thinking of buying a used crane for use on my property, but the one I was looking at seems to have this problem. I might look at some other crane trucks so I don’t have to do the repairs.

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