Tag: Hoist Training

Columbus McKinnon Holds Hoist Workshops in Russia

Columbus McKinnon Holds Hoist Workshops in Russia

Hoist Workshops in Russia
Mr. Nikolay Goch, Managing Director of CMCO Russia, teaches the class. Photo Credit: Julia Pleshan

To showcase Columbus McKinnon and its products for the entertainment industry, the company presented two hoist workshops in Russia last year. Held at the Global Show Trade (Coda Audio) in Moscow, the first workshop was on January 20 and the second on May 12. More than 30 guests from leading Russian rental, installation and rigging companies took part in each session.

The workshops were conducted by Columbus McKinnon Associates, including Nikolay Goch, Managing Director of Columbus McKinnon LLC (Russia); Igor Alyamskiy, commercial director of CMCO Russia; Chris Jones, senior technician and CM-ET trainer at Columbus McKinnon Corporation Limited (UK); and myself.

In the first part of the workshop, presenters provided an overview of CMCO’s history and discussed CMCO’s entertainment product portfolio. The focus was primarily on the CM Lodestar electric chain hoist. The team presented different Lodestar models, pointing out the different requirements and laws that each met. The compact Prostar electric chain hoist was also discussed. Attendees received information on usage standards and rules, hoist structure, safety and maintenance procedures. The workshop concluded with a question and answer session.

During the second part of the workshop, Chris Jones gave demonstrations on the structure of CM Lodestar hoist in action, including a design overview, troubleshooting methods and maintenance recommendations. The workshops proved to be very successful and great opportunities to engage with our customers. Columbus McKinnon plans to hold similar workshops for customers in the future.

The True Meaning of the Name “Lodestar”

The True Meaning of the Name “Lodestar”

Lodestar

Our entertainment trainer, Dave Carmack, travels the world to teach and share important information about entertainment rigging and hoisting safety. At the end of his classes, he likes to stump his students with this question: “Can you tell me why we spell our hoist, LODESTAR, instead of LOADSTAR?”

Dave was asked this question many years ago by a student, which prompted him to do some research. Reaching out to Columbus McKinnon engineers, Dave finally found the answer.

“Lodestar” is defined as a guiding star. In 1955, when the first industrial Lodestar was introduced, many of our hoists had galactic names like Meteor, Satellite, and Comet. It was the first of many unique products that Columbus McKinnon brought to the material handling industry, which also included aluminum hoist frames, the Weston-Type brake, and the first alloy chain.
In a recent CM-ET class, Jamie, a CMCO training course attendee from Canton, Michigan wrote this answer:

“A Lodestar is one that serves as an inspiration, model or guide. The Lodestar hoist was engineered and designed to be a leader and model in the entertainment industry.”

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves!

Want to learn more about entertainment motors? In case you missed it, here is a link to the recording for the session noted below. This is one you won’t want to miss!

Lodestar

Can hoist hooks be repaired?

Can hoist hooks be repaired?

LodestarHook During my training sessions, I am frequently asked if hoist hooks can be repaired if they are damaged or broken. OSHA and ASME regulations provide specific requirements for hoist hook repair to help answer this question.

According to OSHA 1910.179 (L)(3)(iii)(A), hook repairs by welding or reshaping are not generally recommended. If such repairs are attempted they shall be done under competent supervision and the hook shall be load tested before further use.

While OSHA 1910.179 specifically pertains to a crane with top-running girders and top-running trolleys, it states that hook repair is allowed under certain conditions.

On the other hand, ASME B-30.10 Section 10-1.3 (d) states that “attachments, such as handles, latch supports, etc. shall not be welded to a finished hook in field applications. If welding of an attachment such as these is required, it shall be done in manufacturing or fabrication prior to any required final heat treatment.”

So the question remains, can hoist hooks be repaired?

Typically hoist hooks are forgings processed from hot-rolled alloy steel blanks of medium carbon content, such as grade AISI 4140. Hooks can be used in the “as forged” condition or further enhanced by thermal processing (heat treatment). Although fatigue strength improves with heat treatment, there is a resulting loss of ductility and elongation.

A repair that involves welding or any kind of heat treatment can affect the strength and ratings of a hook and therefore is not recommended.

Keep in mind, when a hook is damaged or broken, it can be an indicator that the hoist was overloaded, in which case the entire unit should be inspected for other damages.

In addition to referencing OSHA and ANSI requirements for hook repair, we also recommend that you always contact the manufacturer before making any questionable repairs on their products.

For more information on this topic, check out our Pre-operational Hoist Inspection video.

Further your education on crane and hoist operation and inspection. Check out these upcoming training courses from Columbus McKinnon:

Overhead Crane and Hoist Inspection Certification
CMCO Chain/Wire Rope Hoist Technician Certification

What other hoist or rigging questions do you have?

Columbus McKinnnon Brings CMCO University to Mexico

Columbus McKinnnon Brings CMCO University to Mexico

CMCO University de Mexico

Columbus McKinnon recently opened “CMCO University” in Mexico. The facility will be used to give training to customers, channel partners, and employees. The campus is located within the Santiago Tianguistenco manufacturing plant, near the city of Toluca. It includes 80 square meters of classroom training space and 300 square meters of laboratories and workshops.

“CMCO University is 100% dedicated to delivering knowledge for the operation, installation and repair of hoist and rigging products.” said Rosangel Garcia, Training Coordinator for Latin America. She continued, “When we designed the facility, we modeled the classroom and workshop after the training facility in Tonawanda, New York, USA.”

The modifications to the classroom building and shop floor were completed in November 2012 and officially opened for internal training at that time. The first training class for Columbus McKinnon customers was held in February.

Future plans include additional training classes for customers throughout the Latin America region. The ability to provide education within the region, in the customers’ local language, is a key element in the CMCO strategy of staying close to the customer.

CMCO University de Mexico CMCO University de Mexico

CMCO University is off to a great start!

CMCO University is off to a great start!

CMCO University

Last month Columbus McKinnon kicked off its inaugural session of CMCO University with great success. More than 15 distributor associates from across the country came to our  Niagara Training Center in Tonawanda, N.Y.,  to “Profit from Knowledge,” learning detailed information about our products and how to best sell and position them in the marketplace.

CMCO’s Niagara Training Center is one of the most comprehensive hoist, crane and rigging training centers in the country. With more than 40 hoists, including powered and manual hoists, as well as a variety of crane components and rigging products, attendees gained valuable experience operating the products. They were able to see the interior workings of the hoists, learn about their unique features and conduct hands-on product comparisons.

Testing out Products

Not only did the distributors learn about our products, they also had a chance to enjoy the unique sights and tastes of Buffalo, N.Y., including a trip to one of the Seven Wonders of the World – Niagara Falls; a visit to downtown Buffalo and First Niagara Center for a Buffalo Sabres hockey game; and various meals to experience Buffalo’s famous cuisine.

With the success of our first session, CMCO University classes are filling up fast. Keep an eye out for information on upcoming sessions – we’ll be scheduling throughout 2014.

To learn more about all of our training opportunities, visit our web site.

This post was written by Joshua Karczewski, former Distributor Marketing & Product Launch Manager for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

Webinar Teaches Inspection & Maintenance of CM Hurricane 360 & Short Handle Puller

Webinar Teaches Inspection & Maintenance of CM Hurricane 360 & Short Handle Puller

Do you want to learn how to inspect our new CM Hurricane 360 chain hoist?
Peter Cooke, our Training Manager for Rigging & Load Securement, will teach you how to properly disassemble, inspect and reassemble our popular CM Hurricane 360 hand chain hoist in our free Safety Webinar.  Peter will also walk you though how to set the brake on our CM Hurricane 360 and explain how it can handle your most challenging applications.

Do you have applications that call for drifting a load, standing above a load, or working in confined spaces?
Unlike traditional hand chain hoists, the Hurricane 360 may be used in any direction due to its patented hand chain cover. It rotates 360 degrees allowing a convenient way to move loads without standing under or near the load. The hoist allows for positioning, pulling and lifting of loads from virtually any angle – making it the only hoist of its kind in the industry.

If you have dealt with these tough conditions when operating a hoist, check out our above videos and see how well the Hurricane handles the job.

Plus, Learn How to Inspect a CM Short Handle Puller
During the webinar, Peter will also cover proper inspection techniques for our CM Short Handle Puller. This hoist has a similar brake, yet requires a different approach to set it than your typical Weston type brake. This mechanism was designed for precision positioning and is weatherized.

CM Hurricane 360˚and CM Short Handle Puller Safety Webinar

 

 

Five Intense Days at CM-ET Mega School: An Alumni Review

Five Intense Days at CM-ET Mega School: An Alumni Review

CM-ET Mega School

We love to talk about our entertainment training. We believe in teaching people how to be safer in their work environments. As much as I enjoy hearing stories from our training team, what gives me even greater pleasure is hearing this same enthusiasm echoed from one of our attendees.

Bart Wells from Cory’s Audio Visual Services recently attended our CM Entertainment Mega School. We hosted 45 attendees for 5 days together with instructors from across the country. Bart’s comments really grabbed my attention. But rather than me tell the story, I will let Bart do it himself:

CM-ET Mega SchoolIf you have ever considered attending a manufacturer hosted workshop or training seminar then you know that you run the risk of signing up for a ‘Sales Pitch’ with some education tossed in. Rest assured that if you attended the CM Entertainment Mega School – a 5-day hoist, truss, and rigging seminar – it is 100% education without any ‘selling’ going on the entire week.

“The week begins with a 2-day intensive ‘dive’ into the Lodestar electric chain hoist. Dave Carmack walks you, step by step, through every moving and electrical part of the hoist. Dave’s intimate knowledge of the hoist’s design, engineering and construction make it easy for him to demystify the hoist and allow every student to feel comfortable pulling it apart and putting it back together again.

“With the Road Technician Certification Class (RTC Class) the end of the second day brings an exam. If you passed, you will be rewarded with a CM certification identifying you as a qualified CM Motor Technician. This IS NOT a “gimme” course with a certification that is guaranteed just because you attend. The test is difficult and people do fail. But if you pay attention you will get all the information you need to pass from Dave.

“Day 3 covers truss theory and safe working practices with truss, taught by the president of James Thomas Engineering, Tray Allen.

“Days 4 and 5
are a formula filled frenzy of safe rigging practices, fall protection and rigging calculations. Eric Rouse shares his knowledge of theatrical and aerial rigging while easily relating it to the arena environment as well. His honest approach to safe and practical rigging practices provides the understanding that we are responsible for knowing our craft and keeping ourselves and our peers safe.

“Perhaps the most exciting part of the course is the math. Eric presents the most common formulas that are used in calculating bridal lengths as well as being able to provide load, force and tension calculations for any scenario. This overview provides attendees with the tools to not only “know” that something is safe, but to be able to back it up with numbers.

“In the end the CM Entertainment Mega School is truly a week of education. The instructors are working members of the industry, not salesmen. If you come to the course with the intention of learning 5 new things, you will leave the course with a great deal more than you ever expected. Do not miss the opportunity to become a better, safer and more educated member of the entertainment industry. Attend a CM-ET Mega School this year.”

Barton Wells
Cory’s Audio Visual Services

Helpful CM Entertainment Links:
The LDI Show and Stories from Vegas That We Can Share
What is Wrong with this Entertainment Application?
CM Entertainment Website
CM Entertainment on Twitter

Wire Rope Hoist Training Insights & Why Certification Matters

Wire Rope Hoist Training Insights & Why Certification Matters

Have you ever opened a Shaw-Box 700 Series wire rope hoist to see its inner workings? Do you know what the ideal preventative maintenance schedule should be on a Yale World Series, or how to properly double reeve a Cable King? The Columbus McKinnon training programs answer all these questions and a whole lot more.

In the Wire Rope Hoist Repair Certification class that I attended, each student is exposed to fully operational hoists on girders to unpowered models on accessible dollies. The class was taught by Columbus McKinnon’s training manager Peter Cooke, who has over 16 years of experience. His mix of traditional classroom instruction paired with hands-on training provides the complete setting for this certification course.

Certification is becoming more important.

When asked about the importance of training, many students replied that they were not allowed to work on a company’s hoist unless they furnished proof of certification. This seemed to be a popular response and the direction that the industry is heading.

This certification course is offered over 2 days, and gives each student an accreditation to work in the field with these hoists. In these classes, there are as many seasoned veterans as there are industry rookies which is a testament to the importance placed on certification. Everyone counts.

What material is covered during the training?

A student can expect to spend most of class time taking apart and studying the components of each hoist. Upon breakdown of the hoists, Peter teaches the proper way to inspect and replace parts, reviews wiring schematics and how to access and replace normal wear items. Over the 2 days with fellow industry technicians, there were many opportunities to discuss the tricks of the trade and best practice procedures which students can implement in their current positions.

When looking to further your expertise and gain the certifications required in many of today’s industrial settings, look no further than the Columbus McKinnon training programs. Click here to view a complete listing of training programs and to access the newest training catalog.

Be safe. Get trained.

This post was written by Dan Daumen, former  Product Manager for After Sales Solutions at Columbus McKinnon.

Columbus McKinnon Opens New Training Center

Columbus McKinnon Opens New Training Center

plate lifting

hoist testing

Columbus McKinnon has opened its newest state-of-the-art training facility in Tonawanda, NY. Over the past few months, our training team has been renovating Columbus McKinnon’s previous headquarters(most recently the LodeRail production plant) in Tonawanda, NY into a new training center. This facility now holds certification classes and training courses featuring a combination of classroom and hands-on learning.

Here is an overview of the classes we will be offering in 2012:

By expanding its training offering, Columbus McKinnon now allows distributors and users the opportunity to learn in a controlled environment built for comprehensive training. Our training programs are designed to increase workplace productivity while emphasizing ergonomics and worker safety. For more information on available classes, please visit us at www.cmcodepot.com.

This post was written by Joshua Karczewski, former Distributor Marketing & Product Launch Manager for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

The Answer to this Week’s Maintenance Challenge: How many things can you find wrong with this picture?

The Answer to this Week’s Maintenance Challenge: How many things can you find wrong with this picture?

photo_with answers -2

Thanks to everyone who submitted comments! We added them under the original post. If you have any questions about any of the above notations, please send an e-mail to cmcolive@cmworks.com and we will address them for you.  We are very sorry that our “comment” field wasn’t functioning this week. We are working to resolve the issue.

A quick note about my comment “wrong chain.”  CM Hoist Chain is specifically calibrated to fit the lift wheel.   Using another manufacturer’s chain can severely damage the unit.

If you want to learn more about hoist maintenance and inspection, check out our training site for programs that might interest you.