Tag: safe rigging

Resources for Rigging Safety at your Fingertips

Resources for Rigging Safety at your Fingertips

Many of you work with chain and rigging equipment every day; that’s why Columbus McKinnon works hard to promote the safe and proper use of all rigging products regardless of industry or application. Relying on 139 years of experience in the material handling industry, we’re continually striving to expand and improve our comprehensive offering of rigging training and product resources to help you do your job efficiently and safely. These tools are easy to access and available to you whenever you need them, whether you’re in the office or out in the field.

Rigging Catlog

The Ultimate Rigging Resource
Rigging equipment end-users need information on the proper selection, use and care of rigging products, as well as insight on application and industry requirements. We took all of this information and combined it into one world-class resource – the CM Chain and Rigging Attachments Catalog.

This catalog was a major collaborative effort between our product, application, industry and training teams with feedback from a number of our Channel Partners and end users. It’s more than just a product catalog; it’s the ultimate rigging resource.

To order copies of our new Chain and Rigging Attachments Catalog, fill out our online form or contact CMCO customer service at 1-800-888-0985. You can also download a copy of the new catalog on our website.

Free Safety Webinars
Since their inception in early 2014, our monthly safety webinars have been a tremendous success. These webinars are not sales pitches. These 1/2 hour educational webinars cover safety best practices that you can use everyday. From pre-operational hoist inspection to determining the center of gravity when rigging a load, these free webinars have something for everyone.

Some of our most popular rigging safety webinars include:

If you ever miss one, don’t worry they’re recorded and available online on our YouTube Channel.

Classroom & Hands-On Safety Training

CMCO Training Class

Columbus McKinnon offers classroom and hands-on rigging training from basic to advanced. Our team of full-time instructors are material handling product and safety professionals with more than 100 years of combined experience in the industry. Like our safety webinars, these courses are not sales pitches; they are intense learning experiences that leave attendees with the knowledge and experience they need to safely select, use, inspect and repair overhead cranes, hoists and rigging equipment on a day-to-day basis.

Visit us at www.cmworks.com/training for more information and a complete training schedule.

In-Stock Guarantee (ISG)
In addition to training, we also work hard to ensure our rigging products get to you fast, so you have them when you need them. With that in mind, we are continually expanding our In-Stock Guarantee to ensure shipment of our most popular hoists, chain and rigging products in three days or less. Currently more than 275 products are available through our In-Stock Guarantee.

Product Improvements
We have also made a number of significant product improvements to our rigging portfolio. For example, our shackles now have enhanced markings as well as a new pin design for increased operator safety. We have also expanded our selection of dual-rated rigging products to help customers reduce and better manage their inventory.

Professional riggers, maintenance workers, plant engineers and safety specialists rely on us for knowledge and expertise on material handling products and use – and we hope you do too, using the variety of resources made available to you by Columbus McKinnon.

This article was originally published on June 6, 2013 and was updated with new content on September 26, 2014.

Forging vs. Casting: Which is better?

Forging vs. Casting: Which is better?

forging

This question, “Forging vs. Casting: Which is better?” is one that I have been asked many times. To properly explore the answer, let’s first consider the process of each.

Forging and casting are two very different manufacturing methods. When something is cast the material is heated above its melting temperature and poured into a mold where it solidifies. When something is forged it is physically forced into shape while remaining in a solid state – although it is frequently heated.

As an engineer, I have always known that forgings normally have less surface porosity, finer grain structure, higher tensile strength, better fatigue life/strength, and greater ductility than castings. In other words, forgings are generally better for shackles. The basics of why are pretty simple. When you melt metal to cast it, the grain size is free to expand. When it cools back to a solid, the grain structure is courser and more random, decreasing its strength.

But just how much better is a forging than a casting?

I  did some research on the internet and found an excellent research paper* written by members of the Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Department at the University of Toledo, shared by the Forging Industry Association. This paper compares a single type of product made both ways. Read it here.

How’s this for hard numbers? No pun intended.

Based on this paper:

  • Forged parts had a 26% higher tensile strength than the cast parts. This means you can have stronger shackles at a lower part weight.
  • Forged parts have a 37% higher fatigue strength resulting in a factor of six longer fatigue life. This means that a forged shackle is going to last longer.
  • Cast iron only has 66% of the yield strength of forged steel. Yield strength is an indicator of what load a shackle will hold before starting to deform.
  • The forged parts had a 58% reduction in area when pulled to failure. The cast parts only had a 6% reduction in area. That means there would be much greater deformation before failure in a forged part.

To further illustrate the point, look at these photos from our in-house testing:

forging

These forged CM shackles show significant deformities before failure.

If you were hanging a load overhead from a shackle, wouldn’t you want that shackle to warn you before it failed? Or do you like surprises?

Fortunately, all of our CM shackles are forged;  and they’re forged right here in America at our Chattanooga, Tennessee Operations. Safer and made in America? I think that I will stick to forgings.  What will you do?

* The title of the research paper is “Fatigue Performance Comparison and Life Predictions of Forged Steel & Ductile Cast Iron Crankshafts” written by Jonathan Williams, Farzin Montazersadgh, and Ali Fatemi, Graduate Assistants and Professor, respectively, Mechanical, Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Department, The University Of Toledo – Toledo, Ohio.

Top 5 Reasons Why the CM Super Strong Shackle Rocks

Top 5 Reasons Why the CM Super Strong Shackle Rocks

CM Super Strong ShackleHistory has proven the American-Made CM Super Strong Shackle is one of the most popular shackles on the market. Here are the top 5 reasons I think that’s true:

1. It’s Super Strong
That’s an obvious one, right? But in many cases, by using the Super Strong Shackle, you can use a smaller size shackle while maintaining the required strength and ductility. Our Super Strong Shackles are carbon type shackles which average 17%-50% greater strength than a comparable shackle. As a result of this strength, these shackles have a 6:1 design factor.

2. A Wide Product Offering
We have a full range of sizes and finishes in our Super Strong Shackle product offering.  Below are two brochures available for you to download. Our  CM Shackle Technical Brochure highlights performance characteristics and test data, and our Super Strong Shackle brochure features our complete Super Strong Shackle product offering.

CM Super Strong Shackle
CM Shackle Technical Brochure

3. Proud to be Compliant with the “Buy American Act”
Our chain and rigging attachments are made in the great state of Tennessee, USA. In accordance with the Buy American Act, we can provide you a Certificate of Compliance at your request. Learn more about the Buy American Act.

4. Meets RRC-271 Specifications
The Super Strong Shackle has to be de-rated to meet the specification of RRC- 271. What does this mean? The Super Strong Shackle has the same dimension of the standard carbon shackle that meets RRC 271, however, it’s much stronger. For example, a 1” CM Super Strong Shackle has a WLL of 10 ton, but RRC 271 requirements are 8-1/2. Because they exceed the requirements and are marked with higher strengths, the Super Strong Shackles cannot be represented as meeting RRC 271.

5. It’s In-Stock. We Guarantee It!CM Super Strong Shackle
Columbus McKinnon is committed and prepared to ship our most popular chain and forged attachment products in 3 days – and we guarantee it! This is our In-Stock Guarantee (ISG). Currently, we offer more than 275 hoist, chain and rigging products that are guaranteed to be in stock and ready to ship.

Our In-Stock Guarantee features a number of popular Super Strong Shackles from 3/16” to 1.” Check out our In-Stock Guarantee video

Check out our recent blog article: “What makes our American made Super Strong Shackle super?”

Hook Tip Loading is Risky Business

Hook Tip Loading is Risky Business

Q-&-A-chat_15A

 

 

 

 

Hook tip loading is a common problem. While reading through one of our catalogs, Brian ran across our instructions and asked the following question,  “What does it mean to never insert a hook tip?”

Peter answers:

Hooks typically do not fit into an eyebolt or they don’t seat properly in the saddle of the hook.  This can cause side loading and weaken the strength of the eyebolt.  Inserting a hook directly into the eye of the bolt often results in “Tip Loading.”   A “tip load” would be any load on a hook that is not entirely or wholly seated in the saddle of the hook.  Tip loading subjects the hook to an overload and is never acceptable. It is recommended that a shackle be used to connect a hook to any eyebolt to prevent any unnecessary stress. Please see the below illustration for the correct procedure.

Never insert a hook tip_rev1 copy

For additional reference, please review the ASME B30.10 Hooks  and B30.26 Rigging Hardware safety.

Five Intense Days at CM-ET Mega School: An Alumni Review

Five Intense Days at CM-ET Mega School: An Alumni Review

CM-ET Mega School

We love to talk about our entertainment training. We believe in teaching people how to be safer in their work environments. As much as I enjoy hearing stories from our training team, what gives me even greater pleasure is hearing this same enthusiasm echoed from one of our attendees.

Bart Wells from Cory’s Audio Visual Services recently attended our CM Entertainment Mega School. We hosted 45 attendees for 5 days together with instructors from across the country. Bart’s comments really grabbed my attention. But rather than me tell the story, I will let Bart do it himself:

CM-ET Mega SchoolIf you have ever considered attending a manufacturer hosted workshop or training seminar then you know that you run the risk of signing up for a ‘Sales Pitch’ with some education tossed in. Rest assured that if you attended the CM Entertainment Mega School – a 5-day hoist, truss, and rigging seminar – it is 100% education without any ‘selling’ going on the entire week.

“The week begins with a 2-day intensive ‘dive’ into the Lodestar electric chain hoist. Dave Carmack walks you, step by step, through every moving and electrical part of the hoist. Dave’s intimate knowledge of the hoist’s design, engineering and construction make it easy for him to demystify the hoist and allow every student to feel comfortable pulling it apart and putting it back together again.

“With the Road Technician Certification Class (RTC Class) the end of the second day brings an exam. If you passed, you will be rewarded with a CM certification identifying you as a qualified CM Motor Technician. This IS NOT a “gimme” course with a certification that is guaranteed just because you attend. The test is difficult and people do fail. But if you pay attention you will get all the information you need to pass from Dave.

“Day 3 covers truss theory and safe working practices with truss, taught by the president of James Thomas Engineering, Tray Allen.

“Days 4 and 5
are a formula filled frenzy of safe rigging practices, fall protection and rigging calculations. Eric Rouse shares his knowledge of theatrical and aerial rigging while easily relating it to the arena environment as well. His honest approach to safe and practical rigging practices provides the understanding that we are responsible for knowing our craft and keeping ourselves and our peers safe.

“Perhaps the most exciting part of the course is the math. Eric presents the most common formulas that are used in calculating bridal lengths as well as being able to provide load, force and tension calculations for any scenario. This overview provides attendees with the tools to not only “know” that something is safe, but to be able to back it up with numbers.

“In the end the CM Entertainment Mega School is truly a week of education. The instructors are working members of the industry, not salesmen. If you come to the course with the intention of learning 5 new things, you will leave the course with a great deal more than you ever expected. Do not miss the opportunity to become a better, safer and more educated member of the entertainment industry. Attend a CM-ET Mega School this year.”

Barton Wells
Cory’s Audio Visual Services

Helpful CM Entertainment Links:
The LDI Show and Stories from Vegas That We Can Share
What is Wrong with this Entertainment Application?
CM Entertainment Website
CM Entertainment on Twitter

Our Answer to this Week’s Post, “What’s wrong with this Entertainment Application?”

Our Answer to this Week’s Post, “What’s wrong with this Entertainment Application?”

Dave Carmack 8-28-12

Thank you, Tim & Harris, for your comments. We also received interesting insights on our Facebook page. You know your rigging!  Here is my take on this application:

This is a wire rope support grid. These 1 foot squares allow a rigger to quickly position light loads in specific spots by dropping in a rope through the appropriate square. The anchor point is fixed up above the structure. Notice the strap in the background.

Let’s now address the problems:

  • The thing that jumped out  most to me was the construction of the grid.  The wire ropes must be woven or knitted together.  These were not.  Each overlap should alternate over and under.  This installation has all the ropes in the same direction and on the same side.  The weaving should run in the x and y directions.
  • U-bolts are used to connect each overlap. Since the grid installation itself is wrong, U-bolts are not an acceptable option. U-bolts are typically used for light weight or minor connections such as conduit to a pole. I do not think that you could get the clamping force needed using U-bolts to keep the wire rope cables from slipping under a side force. Wire rope clamps are designed for use with cables.
  • A few of you observed the missing nut on one of the U-bolt assemblies. Nice catch.

When a wire rope support grid is assembled correctly, it transfers the stresses.  When the grid is assembled like in this application, the neighboring ropes are not supporting anything, which can lead to very unfavorable consequences.

We are passionate about education and training.  If you would like to tap into training opportunities in the entertainment field, click here to see our schedule.

Thank you again to everyone who submitted comments. We love to hear from you!  Do you have an application you would like us to review?

 

Disclaimer

IADC Conference Highlights, An Update on Competency Guideline Changes

IADC Conference Highlights, An Update on Competency Guideline Changes

Oil & Gas

Over the summer I had the opportunity to share a Hoist Safety presentation at the International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC) conference in Lafayette, Louisiana. Since 1940, the International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC) has exclusively represented the worldwide oil and gas drilling industry. IADC’s mission is three-fold: to advance drilling and completion technology; improve industry health, safety, environmental and training practices; and champion sensible regulations and legislation which facilitate safe and efficient drilling. Membership is open to any company involved in oil and gas exploration, drilling or production, well servicing, oil field manufacturing or other rig-site services.

The meeting focused on training and competency.

A group called the Offshore Lifting Safety Data Workgroup (OLSDW) formed in 2009 analyzed lifting data/incidents on the outer continental shelf. They looked at data from 2007 – 2011. From this data they concluded that the majority of the injuries were happening from human error. Incidents occurred when individuals came in contact with the load or loads shifted. The OLSDW is recommending that more emphasis be placed on proper rigging training. The focus is to ensure that riggers are following proper procedures.

How do we measure competency?

IADC presenters asked a very important question. “How do we measure competency?”
A  member stated “…a person can be very competent up to or until they have an incident.”  Even though the individual may be well trained, they may have made a bad decision or choice on that given day or time period. Training is important, but it represents only one aspect of competency.

Hercules Offshore put things into perspective when they showed an engaging video. The video showed a family man who was very aware of safety and even taught his son safe practices at home. When he arrives at work, he is tired from a poor night’s sleep. He finds out he did not get promoted. One of his crew team members is sick but is working through it. Some of the guys are not taking the morning safety briefing seriously and joking around. The supervisor comes in and tells them there is a rush to get a job done and to get back to work immediately.

Three Outcomes

As these daily distractions happen, the focus is no longer on the job task at hand. Suddenly, there is an accident. The video shows three outcomes.

1. In the first outcome, the family man dies. His family is devastated. A wife is without her husband, depressed and not able to engage with her son who is also equally depressed. Their lives are ruined.

2. In the second outcome, the man severly injures his arm. When he arrives home from the hospital, he is addicted to pain medicine and depressed. He no longer engages with his family. His marriage is falling apart. Their lives are seriously impacted.

3. The third outcome shows what happens when the job was done properly and everyone stayed competent. The man arrives back home safely. Life is normal. This outcome is what is expected and should happen every day.

Think about your own state of mind or physical condition.

Many of us drive cars. How many times have we been tired, angry, upset, sick and should not have been behind the wheel or just simply driving bad at a given time? I sure many of you reading this message agree.

Managers, supervisors and employees need to spot or recognize times where distractions can lead to incompetency from competent people. Proper training, procedures and checks can help minimize the risks. We need to be more aware of our surroundings. Not just site hazards but also be aware of ourselves and the people we work with.

IADC is working to develop worldwide competency guidelines.

IADC has started a challenging project to develop worldwide competency guidelines for virtually all rig positions for the oil field. The American Petroleum Institute, (API) is also taking this seriously. They are revamping their API RP 2D to address training for lifting operations. The 7th addition, expected to be completed and out for balloting by January 2013, will revolve around training required for personnel that are involved with lifting operations. (crane operators, inspectors and riggers.) There will be more emphasis on “hands on” training and the demonstration of competencies.

Columbus McKinnon has a “hands on” rigging training program called the Qualified Rigger Workshop. This 3 day course is 50% lecture and 50% hands-on. Students are tested with (2) written tests and hands-on exercises to demonstrate competency. A third party rigging certification (level 1 basic or level 2 advanced) through Crane Institute Certification is offered as an option on the 4th day.

Invest the time to get the training that you need. Be aware of your surroundings. Be safe.

What Makes Our American-Made Super Strong Shackle “Super”

What Makes Our American-Made Super Strong Shackle “Super”

Designed and forged in Chattanooga, Tennessee, American made super strong shackle CM Super Strong shackles are carbon-type shackles with strength ratings that are up to 50% stronger than comparable sized carbon shackles. As a result, they are designed with a 6:1 safety design factor.

By using a special blended material, Columbus McKinnon is able to manufacture Super Strong shackles without requiring the quench and temper process. This gives our Super Strong shackles a higher working load limit (WLL) and greater design factor.

Our microalloy material is designed to be air cooled from normal forging temperatures. This air-cooling process eliminates the potential for errors in hardness and strength or quench cracks in the heat treating process.

The strength level of the microalloy forgings will be higher than the normal strength to hardness correlation allowing for greater ductility before failure.  The microalloy has the ability to distribute strain throughout the section more uniformly than conventional steels.  At the same hardness the microalloy will be stronger.

Below are Comparison Testing results of CM Super Strong Shackles versus Standard Carbon Shackles.  While all of the CM shackles performed above their ratings, the Super Strong shackle performance was superior.

 

American-made super strong shackle

Questions often arise about the difference between our Industrial/Government shackles and the Super Strong shackles. An Industrial/Government shackle is a Super Strong shackle de-rated to meet – not exceed – the Federal Specification RR-C-271. That means it has the same dimensions and performance characteristics as a Super Strong shackle but is stamped with specifications to meet government requirements.

Example:
1″ Super Strong shackle will be stamped 10 Ton WLL
1″ Industrial/Government shackle will be stamped 8 1/2 Ton WLL

But don’t just listen to us. Listen to an impartial opinion and see the results of a test performed by Arizona Wire Rope. This distributor tested on a Tonzilla 500,000 lb pull tester comparing the CM Super Strong shackle to our competitor’s shackle. Check out the results for yourself!

We have a full range of sizes and finishes in the Super Strong Shackle product offering. Click here to view our newest CM Shackle Technical Brochure.

Choose the CM Bundling Clip for your Heavy Duty Applications

Choose the CM Bundling Clip for your Heavy Duty Applications

Have you ever rigged a bundled load only to have that load spill out once your sling went slack?  The  solution is the CM Bundling Clip, which prevents the choker from going slack and the load from spreading after being unhooked. It also eliminates shear points and damage to wire rope. Check out our latest video and see the application for yourself.

Bundling ClipOur new Bundling Clip is built for the harsh environments and demanding applications of the oil and gas industry as well as for rail yards, logging, construction applications or wherever you are lifting, storing or moving cylindrical material.