Tag: safety webinar

Reading RFID Chips on Rigging Equipment

Reading RFID Chips on Rigging Equipment

RFID chip

Mike, a Lead Rigging Technician for an equipment rental company in the entertainment industry and recent safety webinar attendee, asks:

“How far away should you be to read a RFID chip for rigging equipment tracking and inspection?”

Troy Raines, Columbus McKinnon Chain & Rigging Product Engineering Manager and safety webinar presenter, answers the RFID chip question:

This is an excellent and frequently asked question.  The simple answer is that it depends on the type of RFID chip being used in the product. For CM Smart ID, we chose a chip that would require the user to touch the reader to the chip. While this might seem inconvenient, the benefits far outweigh the disadvantages for the following two reasons:

  1. To properly inspect any piece of rigging hardware, the qualified person must actually handle it. It wouldn’t be safe or effective to “inspect” rigging hardware from any distance. There is too much risk that a minor issue could be overlooked until it became a more serious safety hazard.
  2. To effectively track inventory, it wouldn’t be accurate to accidently scan the wrong shackle because multiple shackles in the area could be read at the same time. The count would frequently be wrong because you wouldn’t know which shackles were and were not scanned.

Want to learn more? View our Safety Webinar on RFID: Simplifying Rigging Hardware Inspection and Tracking.

Customer Questions Acceleration Time on Variable Frequency Drives

Customer Questions Acceleration Time on Variable Frequency Drives

3-VFDTom, a salesperson for a CMCO distributor and recent safety webinar attendee, asked the following question on variable frequency drives:

3-step infinitely variable control is 1st detent slow speed, 2nd detent HOLD, 3rd detent acceleration. If the application absolutely requires less than 2.0 second acceleration (Lodestar) can anything be done to accommodate?

Chris Zgoda, Corporate Trainer and webinar presenter, answers:

Thank you for your question. When the power is on and applied to the inverter, you can access the “U” parameters. The “U” parameters are the monitor parameters that allow the user to see what is happening. Too low of an acceleration time could present the following two issues:

  1. It could pull too much voltage off the DC Bus too quickly and cause a Uv (Under Voltage) fault.  Viewing the “U” parameter that monitors the DC Bus voltage you will see the DC Bus has approximately 340 Volts on it for a 230V hoist.  With an UP run button press you will note the voltage drops significantly at the first button press. With too quick of a ramp-up time, the voltage will drop even more causing an Under Voltage.
  2. Another potential fault is an Oc fault (Over Current) fault, meaning the inrush current that energizes the motor stator. Generally, the inrush current is about 150% of full load amps. The faster you take that motor from 0 RPM to 1725 RPM, the more current “energy” it will need.  So you could have a huge inrush current, especially if you have a heavy load on the hook, which may cause the drive to fault out, too.  You can also monitor the output current from the drive in the “U” parameter.

I might also note that the acceleration times are based on the full scale frequency of operation,  meaning an acceleration time of 5 seconds is from 0 to 60 Hz. If you press the pendant button for the 1st speed, it would not take 5 seconds to reach 6 Hz. It would be approx. 0.5 seconds.

Always follow factory service procedures when making adjustments to products.

For additional information, check out our Variable Frequency Drives Safety Webinar.

Does Welding Spatter Warrant the Replacement of a Chain?

Does Welding Spatter Warrant the Replacement of a Chain?

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Joe, a salesperson for a CMCO distributor and recent safety webinar attendee, asks: “Does welding spatter warrant the replacement of a chain?”

Peter Cooke, CMCO Training Manager and Safety Webinar presenter, answers:
Yes, weld spatter does warrant chain replacement. Weld spatter should be considered as heat damage. Because hoist chain is heat treated, any heat 410 degrees F and up could have an effect on the chain’s integrity. Weld splatter is molten metal at temperatures above 2,000 degrees. When it comes into contact with the chain, weld spatter adversely affects the heat treat properties of the link or links and the chain must be replaced.

To learn more about hoist chain inspection & lubrication, we encourage you watch the following safety webinars:

Hoist Chain Inspection and Maintenance
Hoist Chain Lubrication: Why is it so important?

Do Chain Slings Need to Be Load Tested After a Repair Has Been Performed?

Do Chain Slings Need to Be Load Tested After a Repair Has Been Performed?

Chain SlingXavier, a salesperson for a CMCO distributor, asks the following question:
“I am doing some research on the guidelines and laws concerning repairs made to chain slings. I found some very conflicting information from OSHA and ASME. To summarize, ASME states that chain slings do not need to be load tested after a repair has been performed. OSHA says that new and repaired chain slings must be load tested before being returned to service. I was hoping to get your opinion and maybe Columbus McKinnon’s official stance on this issue.“

Peter Cooke, CMCO Training Manager, answers:
Thank you for reaching out to us with your concern. This is a great question. If the chain is a welded assembly (only certain companies are authorized to do this) and a welded link was repaired, then the sling needs to be load tested. If the sling is made up of mechanical components and those components have been individually load tested by the manufacturer, no load test needs to be done.

For example, I have a single-leg sling and I replace the top oblong link. The oblong link is connected with a mechanical coupler, such as a Hammerlok, and has been tested by the manufacturer. Under these conditions, I do not have to load test the sling, but I would recommend inspecting the sling, link by link, to be sure all components are safe to use per ASME B30.9 and OSHA 1910.184.

For additional information, check out our Chain Sling Inspection Safety Webinar or our new Rigging Catalog.

Free Safety Webinars to Resume in January 2015

Free Safety Webinars to Resume in January 2015

Each month, the Columbus McKinnon training team hosts a free online safety webinar. We will not be holding a webinar in December, but to keep you focused on safety during this holiday break, we had a little fun making a video featuring five important tips to get you through the season safely.

We hope to see you in January, when our monthly safety webinars return with
Hoist Chain Lubrication: Why is it so Important?Register now.

Need a stocking stuffer idea?
Order the complete set of Safety Webinars!
We’ve compiled all of our 2014 recorded webinars on one convenient USB thumb drive. As an added bonus, we have also included all of our 2013 Safety Webinars.

Order by Christmas and we’ll include a free CM Rigging Guide!

We would like to thank all of our past safety webinar attendees for their time and interest, with a special call out to our Safety All-Stars for 2014:

  • Standard Crane, the company who attended the most CMCO Safety Webinars
  • Patrick Cox of Westech Rigging Supply, the individual who attended the most CMCO Safety Webinars

Thanks for all of the great feedback we have received on our safety webinars this year. Stay tuned for more engaging content to help you work safer in 2015!

The True Meaning of the Name “Lodestar”

The True Meaning of the Name “Lodestar”

Lodestar

Our entertainment trainer, Dave Carmack, travels the world to teach and share important information about entertainment rigging and hoisting safety. At the end of his classes, he likes to stump his students with this question: “Can you tell me why we spell our hoist, LODESTAR, instead of LOADSTAR?”

Dave was asked this question many years ago by a student, which prompted him to do some research. Reaching out to Columbus McKinnon engineers, Dave finally found the answer.

“Lodestar” is defined as a guiding star. In 1955, when the first industrial Lodestar was introduced, many of our hoists had galactic names like Meteor, Satellite, and Comet. It was the first of many unique products that Columbus McKinnon brought to the material handling industry, which also included aluminum hoist frames, the Weston-Type brake, and the first alloy chain.
In a recent CM-ET class, Jamie, a CMCO training course attendee from Canton, Michigan wrote this answer:

“A Lodestar is one that serves as an inspiration, model or guide. The Lodestar hoist was engineered and designed to be a leader and model in the entertainment industry.”

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves!

Want to learn more about entertainment motors? In case you missed it, here is a link to the recording for the session noted below. This is one you won’t want to miss!

Lodestar