Tag: shackle

New CM Shackle Markings and Pins Lead to Improved Operator Safety

New CM Shackle Markings and Pins Lead to Improved Operator Safety

Over the past few years, our forging operations in Chattanooga, Tennessee, have been working vigorously to improve product quality and deliveries. As you have seen with our In-Stock Guarantee, we remain committed to manufacturing the highest quality products in the market, stocking over 275 of our most popular chain and forged rigging attachment products and guaranteeing to ship them in 3 business days.

As part of this commitment to quality, we implemented some changes that resulted in even higher quality shackles. These changes include larger CM shackle markings and a new shackle pin design.

CM shackle markings

Enhanced Shackle Identification Markings

The forged identification markings on our CM shackles are now the largest and most user-friendly on the market.  The lettering has draft and rounded edges for use with synthetics. Some of the benefits of the larger and more legible lettering are:

CM shackle markings
Old Shackle Size
CM shackle markings
New Shackle Size

Improved operator safety by reducing the risk of users misreading or not being able to read important size and WLL information.

Reduction in replacement costs by decreasing necessary out-of-service issues due to worn and illegible identification.

Easier identification of the product as a CM shackle with a larger CM logo forged into the side.

CM shackle markings
Old Shackle Logo
CM shackle markings
New Shackle Logo

New Pins

We have also changed the shackle pins on our Screw Pin Anchor shackles (SPA) to provide more efficient thread fitting inside and outside of the shackle.

CM shackle marking
New High Strength Pin

Both the enhanced ID markings and the new pins are now on all shackles we ship today. We will continue to look for even more ways to improve the safety and durability of our shackles, to ensure we are providing the highest quality products to our customers.

This article was originally posted on June 13, 2013. Updates were made on April 6, 2017 to keep our information current.

Tim Lewis
Tim Lewis is a Business Development Manager at Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Are Your Shackles Safe for Overhead Lifting?

Are Your Shackles Safe for Overhead Lifting?

lifting shackles
Chain Style Shackle
lifting shackles
Anchor Style Shackle

When determining the best shackle for your lifting application, there are many options to choose from. Shackles are typically available in two styles: chain style and anchor style.

Chain shackles are best-suited for straight line, single connection pulls because of their U-shape. Anchor or bow shackles have a more generous loop. This allows them to be side loaded or used for multiple connections.

Whether you use chain or anchor shackles, there are three types of pins that are used to secure a shackle, each with their own benefits and limitations.

lifting shackles
Screw pin shackle
lifting shackles
Bolt, nut and cotter shackle
lifting shackles
Round pin shackle

 

 

Screw Pin Lifting Shackles

Screw Pin Shackles allow for quick and easy removal of the screw pin, which makes this style ideal for applications where the shackle is removed frequently. While the threaded pin can resist axial forces, it should not be cyclically loaded. Additionally, it is unreliable and vulnerable to backing out in applications where the pin is subjected to a torque or twisting action. In some applications, it is recommended to “mouse” the screw pin to prevent it from unscrewing. This type of shackle is suitable for overhead lifting.

Bolt, Nut & Cotter Lifting Shackles

Of all shackle types, bolt, nut, and cotter shackles provide the most secure pin arrangement, resisting axial and torsional loading. This type of shackle should be used in semi-permanent applications where the pin is removed infrequently. Bolt, nut, and cotter shackles are suitable for overhead lifting.

Round Pin Lifting Shackles

Round Pin Shackles allow for easy removal by simply removing the cotter that holds the pin in place. These shackles perform well where the pin is subjected to a torque or twisting action. They are not recommended for use where the pin is subject to an axial load. Round pin shackles are not suitable for overhead lifting.

For more information on shackles, check out our safety webinar on the Proper Use of Shackles or our other blog articles on shackles.

Christie Lagowski
Christie Lagowski is a Communications Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Nine Important Rules to Follow When Using Shackles

Nine Important Rules to Follow When Using Shackles

shackles

Shackles are used every day in a variety of rigging and load securement applications. Before you use a shackle, there are nine important rules to keep in mind.

Rule 1:

When making a sling, attach multiple sling legs to the bow, not the pin. Attaching legs to the pin can damage and weaken the sling.

Rule 2:

When point loading shackle to shackle, connect bow to bow or bow to pin. Never connect pin to pin.

Rule 3:

Do not side load “D” shaped shackles such as chain shackles or long reach shackles. These shackles are designed and rated for in-line applied tension. Therefore, the center line of the load should coincide with the center line of the shackle. Anchor body style shackles (screw pin style, as pictured above, or bolt nut cotter anchor body style) can be side loaded. Always refer to reductions in rating charts when performing this type of rigging.

Rule 4:

When securing a load, the bow of the shackle should be put into the running side of a choke.

Rule 5:

When using a shackle with wire rope, the shackle must be equal to or larger than the wire rope diameter.

Rule 6:

If using a shackle with synthetic slings, ensure the shackle is big enough to avoid pinching or binding the sling.

Rule 7:

Shackles should not be subjected to high or low temperatures that could affect thermal treatment and the strength of the shackle.  -4 degrees F to 400 degrees F is the operating range for full working load limit.

Rule 8:

Always ensure shackle pins are properly engaged. Screw pin shackles need to have threads fully engaged on the shackle ear. (The pin should be flush with the outside of the shackle body or slightly past). The pin head should make contact with the shackle body. Bolt nut and cotter shackles need to have the bolt and nut properly secured with the cotter pin attached.

Rule 9:

Use bolt nut cotter anchor style shackles, if shackles will remain in place as a semi-permanent application or if they will be suspending a load. Screw pin shackles are used when the shackles are removed after the lift is complete. If a screw pin shackle is being used to suspend the load for any length of time, it is advisable that you mouse or tie off the pin to the body of the shackle with wire.
Want to learn more about safe shackle use? Here are some additional resources:

Shackle Markings, Materials and Appropriate Standards
New CM Shackle Markings and Pins Lead to Improved Operator Safety
Customer Concerns over Recommended Shackle Pin Length
Safety Webinar: Proper Use of Shackles 

Last updated on 12/21/15

Christie Lagowski
Christie Lagowski is a Communications Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Forging vs. Casting: Which is better?

Forging vs. Casting: Which is better?

forging

This question, “Forging vs. Casting: Which is better?” is one that I have been asked many times. To properly explore the answer, let’s first consider the process of each.

Forging and casting are two very different manufacturing methods. When something is cast the material is heated above its melting temperature and poured into a mold where it solidifies. When something is forged it is physically forced into shape while remaining in a solid state – although it is frequently heated.

As an engineer, I have always known that forgings normally have less surface porosity, finer grain structure, higher tensile strength, better fatigue life/strength, and greater ductility than castings. In other words, forgings are generally better for shackles. The basics of why are pretty simple. When you melt metal to cast it, the grain size is free to expand. When it cools back to a solid, the grain structure is courser and more random, decreasing its strength.

But just how much better is a forging than a casting?

I  did some research on the internet and found an excellent research paper* written by members of the Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Department at the University of Toledo, shared by the Forging Industry Association. This paper compares a single type of product made both ways. Read it here.

How’s this for hard numbers? No pun intended.

Based on this paper:

  • Forged parts had a 26% higher tensile strength than the cast parts. This means you can have stronger shackles at a lower part weight.
  • Forged parts have a 37% higher fatigue strength resulting in a factor of six longer fatigue life. This means that a forged shackle is going to last longer.
  • Cast iron only has 66% of the yield strength of forged steel. Yield strength is an indicator of what load a shackle will hold before starting to deform.
  • The forged parts had a 58% reduction in area when pulled to failure. The cast parts only had a 6% reduction in area. That means there would be much greater deformation before failure in a forged part.

To further illustrate the point, look at these photos from our in-house testing:

forging

These forged CM shackles show significant deformities before failure.

If you were hanging a load overhead from a shackle, wouldn’t you want that shackle to warn you before it failed? Or do you like surprises?

Fortunately, all of our CM shackles are forged;  and they’re forged right here in America at our Chattanooga, Tennessee Operations. Safer and made in America? I think that I will stick to forgings.  What will you do?

* The title of the research paper is “Fatigue Performance Comparison and Life Predictions of Forged Steel & Ductile Cast Iron Crankshafts” written by Jonathan Williams, Farzin Montazersadgh, and Ali Fatemi, Graduate Assistants and Professor, respectively, Mechanical, Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering Department, The University Of Toledo – Toledo, Ohio.

Troy Raines
Troy Raines is the Chain & Rigging Product Engineering Manager at our CMCO Chattanooga Forge Operations.
American Made DNV Type Approved and Certified Shackles for the Oil and Gas Industry

American Made DNV Type Approved and Certified Shackles for the Oil and Gas Industry

Columbus McKinnon has recently extended its offering of DNV Type Approved and Certified Shackles to meet the growing needs of the offshore oil and gas industry.  Backed by the strong CM brand name, these Bolt & Nut style carbon anchor shackles provide reliable performance in the harshest environments.

Below are a few key features of these shackles:

  • Certified to meet DNV Standard 2.7-1 Offshore Containers SpecificationsDNV Type Approved and Certified Shackles
  • Meet RR-C-271 & ISO 2415 performance requirements
  • Heavy duty & built to last
  • Innovative design
  • Designed for use with chain, wire rope, and synthetic slings
  • Available in capacities from 4-3/4 Tons to 25 Tons
  • Made in the USA.

Did you know that our DNV shackles are manufactured in Tennessee?

In accordance with the Buy American Act, we can provide you a Certificate of Compliance at your request.
Download a DNV Shackle flyer or watch our video to discover more.

This blog post was originally written on May 14, 2013, and has recently been updated.

Gisela Clark
Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Top 5 Reasons Why the CM Super Strong Shackle Rocks

Top 5 Reasons Why the CM Super Strong Shackle Rocks

CM Super Strong ShackleHistory has proven the American-Made CM Super Strong Shackle is one of the most popular shackles on the market. Here are the top 5 reasons I think that’s true:

1. It’s Super Strong
That’s an obvious one, right? But in many cases, by using the Super Strong Shackle, you can use a smaller size shackle while maintaining the required strength and ductility. Our Super Strong Shackles are carbon type shackles which average 17%-50% greater strength than a comparable shackle. As a result of this strength, these shackles have a 6:1 design factor.

2. A Wide Product Offering
We have a full range of sizes and finishes in our Super Strong Shackle product offering.  Below are two brochures available for you to download. Our  CM Shackle Technical Brochure highlights performance characteristics and test data, and our Super Strong Shackle brochure features our complete Super Strong Shackle product offering.

CM Super Strong Shackle
CM Shackle Technical Brochure

3. Proud to be Compliant with the “Buy American Act”
Our chain and rigging attachments are made in the great state of Tennessee, USA. In accordance with the Buy American Act, we can provide you a Certificate of Compliance at your request. Learn more about the Buy American Act.

4. Meets RRC-271 Specifications
The Super Strong Shackle has to be de-rated to meet the specification of RRC- 271. What does this mean? The Super Strong Shackle has the same dimension of the standard carbon shackle that meets RRC 271, however, it’s much stronger. For example, a 1” CM Super Strong Shackle has a WLL of 10 ton, but RRC 271 requirements are 8-1/2. Because they exceed the requirements and are marked with higher strengths, the Super Strong Shackles cannot be represented as meeting RRC 271.

5. It’s In-Stock. We Guarantee It!CM Super Strong Shackle
Columbus McKinnon is committed and prepared to ship our most popular chain and forged attachment products in 3 days – and we guarantee it! This is our In-Stock Guarantee (ISG). Currently, we offer more than 275 hoist, chain and rigging products that are guaranteed to be in stock and ready to ship.

Our In-Stock Guarantee features a number of popular Super Strong Shackles from 3/16” to 1.” Check out our In-Stock Guarantee video

Check out our recent blog article: “What makes our American made Super Strong Shackle super?”

Tim Lewis
Tim Lewis is a Business Development Manager at Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
Hook Tip Loading is Risky Business

Hook Tip Loading is Risky Business

Q-&-A-chat_15A

 

 

 

 

Hook tip loading is a common problem. While reading through one of our catalogs, Brian ran across our instructions and asked the following question,  “What does it mean to never insert a hook tip?”

Peter answers:

Hooks typically do not fit into an eyebolt or they don’t seat properly in the saddle of the hook.  This can cause side loading and weaken the strength of the eyebolt.  Inserting a hook directly into the eye of the bolt often results in “Tip Loading.”   A “tip load” would be any load on a hook that is not entirely or wholly seated in the saddle of the hook.  Tip loading subjects the hook to an overload and is never acceptable. It is recommended that a shackle be used to connect a hook to any eyebolt to prevent any unnecessary stress. Please see the below illustration for the correct procedure.

Never insert a hook tip_rev1 copy

For additional reference, please review the ASME B30.10 Hooks  and B30.26 Rigging Hardware safety.

Peter Cooke
Peter Cooke is a Training Manager specializing in Rigging & Load Securement for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.
In-Stock Guarantee Sets New Industry Standard

In-Stock Guarantee Sets New Industry Standard

We are changing the way we do business.
Changes that not only affect Columbus McKinnon and our Channel Partners, but the entire material handling industry.

We are committed, and now prepared, to ship our most popular chain and forged attachment products in 3 days – and we guarantee it. This is our In-Stock Guarantee (ISG). This is not a promotion, but a new industry-changing way of doing business.

The ISG business model has been developed from the top down, with a focus on providing best-in-class service and the most popular chain and forged attachment products that our end-users use every day. For our Channel Partners and distributors, it means that they can reduce their inventory while increasing their cash flow. It also means that they’ll be able to deliver products to their customers on time, every time.

Made-USACurrently, Columbus McKinnon offers more than 135 chain and rigging products that are guaranteed to be in stock and ready to ship — and made in America.

Watch our video to learn more about the In-Stock Guarantee, and meet some of the hard-working CMCO Associates who are committed to ship in 3 days.

Gary Krypel
Gary Krypel is the Marketing Communications Manager for Columbus McKinnon.
Expect the Unexpected at ProMat 2013

Expect the Unexpected at ProMat 2013

CMCO-Promat-Booth_1
With ProMat 2013 starting this week, we want to give everyone an idea of what they can expect to see at Columbus McKinnon Booth #1838.

First off, expect the unexpected. We’ll be unveiling our most interactive and tech-savvy booth ever. Designed to showcase our brands and innovative products and services, our guests will have the opportunity to participate in a number of hands-on demonstrations and displays.

Guests will get a sneak peek at a ton of soon-to-be-launched products, including:

  • CM Universal Trolley (UT). Our most flexible hoist trolley ever.
    The UT can be used with virtually every CMCO electric and air chain
    hoist up to 3-ton capacity, and can fit on various beam widths.
  • CM Bandit. Our lightest and most compact ratchet lever hoist ever!
    This rugged hoist is ideal for applications even in the tightest workspaces. Guests can test drive the Bandit, lift a load and check out its great free-chaining feature.
  • CM Lodestar 2 Ton Single Reeved electric chain hoist features better headroom and less chain weight; but you can see it and try it for yourself.
  • CTP adjustable trolley clamp is a heavy duty, yet economical, trolley designed for easy installation and superior strength. No tools are required
    to move and adjust the CTP to a variety of different sized beams.
  • Ergo Pendant Station for CMCO electric chain hoists. See its ergonomic design — developed in partnership with The Ohio State University — feel how comfortably it fits in your hand while you work the legendary CMCO rocker style push button switch.

It doesn’t end there. A number of popular recently-launched products will also be at ProMat, including:

Rigging-Display_1

  • Yale Global King Wire Rope Hoist. Discover what’s new with this world-class hoist, from Quick Ship units and the 3-year standard warranty to explosion-proof options.
  • Dixie Industries Sixth Wheel Ratchet. The patented ergonomic solution for the hazardous task of lowering tractor trailer landing gear. Come by, try it for yourself, and discover how this innovative design can prevent injuries.
  • CM Hurricane 360˚ hand chain hoist will be featured in the “Drifting Challenge.” Test your material handling skills and see first-hand how easy it is to drift a load with the Hurricane 360˚— seeing and doing is believing.
  • CM Lodestar Cutaway will allow guests to see the inter-workings of an operational Lodestar electric chain hoist. It’s a rare opportunity to see under the cover of a superior design in action.
  • Our new hands-on Rigging Display lets you get up close to discover the craftsmanship and engineering forged into all our rigging products. While you’re there, check out some application photos on the digital display.

If you’re at ProMat you won’t be able to miss our new soaring Video Tower featuring the latest product visuals and on-demand product and training information. Lastly, register for a chance to win a seat in a CMCO Training Class of your choice in 2013. Stop by and ask for all the details.

At Columbus McKinnon, we engineer and build innovative material handling products for people and businesses that care about quality, safety, and having the right tools for their applications. Our presence and product offering on display at ProMat 2013 is proof of that. Discover us at Booth #1838.

Gary Krypel
Gary Krypel is the Marketing Communications Manager for Columbus McKinnon.
Columbus McKinnon Helps you Understand and Comply with the Buy American Act

Columbus McKinnon Helps you Understand and Comply with the Buy American Act

Many of you have been asking us about the Buy American Act (BAA),  whether our rigging products are made in America, and if they comply with BAA requirements.  Did you know that, unless an exception applies, the BAA requires domestic manufacturing of an end product and that more than half the cost of its components be derived from U.S. made components? Canadian-made products may not be a BAA-governed purchase.

Columbus McKinnon offers a full complement of made in America rigging and hoist products that comply with the Buy American Act.

What is the Buy American Act?

The BAA dates back to 1933 and, absent an exception, generally requires in covered procurements the furnishing of domestic end products for supplies or construction material. Some of the limited exceptions to the BAA’s requirements include the Government’s grant of a public interest waiver or the non-availability of (or unreasonable pricing of) viable domestic sources.

Other Buy American/Buy America Regimes

If your project is funded by the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA), a similar, but not identical, domestic sourcing requirement applies.

In 2009, with the intent of stimulating and reinvigorating the U.S. economy with new projects designed to put Americans back to work, Congress included a similar “Buy American” requirement in the ARRA—Section 1605. Similar to its 1933 predecessor, unless a narrow exception applies, Section 1605 provides that no ARRA funds may be used for a project for the construction, alteration, maintenance, or repair of a public building or public work in the U.S. unless all iron, steel and manufactured goods used as construction material in the project are produced or manufactured in the United States.

The BAA and the ARRA’s Section 1605 do not, however, stand alone. For instance, projects funded by sub-agencies of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DoT) impose other unique “Buy American” or “Buy America” requirements to projects they fund. DoT components imposing such unique requirements include the Federal Aviation Administration (“FAA”), Federal Highway Administration (“FHWA”), Federal Railroad Administration (“FRA”) High Speed Rail Program, National Railroad Passenger Corporation (“AMTRAK”), and the Federal Transit Administration (“FTA”).

Why Compliance Matters and Why We Have Seen An Upsurge in Inquiries In This Area?

Compliance with the BAA and other domestic preference regimes is critical. They typically are part of a contract, so non-compliance can result in a price reduction or default termination. However, contract liability is not the only risk factor. Because compliance typically is certified by contractors, an inaccuracy in the certification can lead to other civil, administrative, or even criminal action, such as the initiation of suspension/debarment, False Claims Act, or False Statements Act proceedings. The bottom-line is that it is essential that companies supplying end products to the Government get it right.

In recent years, there has been a clear trend of Government contracting personnel and auditors focusing upon and testing contractor compliance with the BAA, TAA, and other applicable regimes. With respect to the ARRA in particular, the statute included significant funds for audits relating to its many requirements, including Section 1605’s Buy American requirement. Auditors are circulating in large numbers to make sure that companies are complying.

Conclusions

There are many statutes that govern these federally funded projects. For those requiring the manufacture of end products in the U.S. and/or domestic components, you need to know that the products you purchase are of US origin. Columbus McKinnon’s products for government contracts are manufactured in the United States. These rigging and hoist products comply with the BAA and the ARRA’s Section 1605.  Make your life easier by partnering with Columbus McKinnon, and support American manufacturing in the process.

Public Resources:

Section 1605 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
Buy American Act
U.S. DOE Buy American Act Webinar

** The above is not intended to constitute legal advice and should not be relied upon as same. Readers should seek independent legal counsel if they have questions related to BAA compliance or compliance with other domestic preference-type regimes.

This blog post was updated on April 20, 2017 to keep the content current.

Gisela Clark
Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.