Tag: South Africa

Yale Lifting Solutions Provides 200-Ton Test Rig for Hook Proof Load Testing

Yale Lifting Solutions Provides 200-Ton Test Rig for Hook Proof Load Testing

Test Rig
200-ton capacity horizontal test rig is used to proof load test humble hooks in the South African gold mining industry.

Yale Lifting Solutions was recently approached by a long-time client in the South African gold mining industry to provide a 200-ton capacity horizontal test rig used to proof load test humble hooks. Humble hooks are safety devices used to connect winder ropes to the main personnel cages and ore conveyances on hoists in vertical mine shafts.

How does the test rig work?

A humble hook is installed in the test rig and the operator sets the testing parameters. The test rig then automatically carries out the test and, upon completion, produces a test certificate containing relevant testing information that can be printed out or saved electronically. Typically, the rig tests each humble hook to 65 tons, but has a maximum testing capacity of 200 tons if needed. Each rig weighs more than 5,500 kg. (12,000 lbs.).

Also, because safety is a critical part of the way Columbus McKinnon does business, each test rig is fitted with a safety cage to prevent possible injury should something fail during the testing process. By use of strategically positioned limit switches working in conjunction with the control program, the test rig will only operate if the cage is closed. Once this test is complete, the humble hooks undergo an ultrasonic test before they are put into storage awaiting installation on the hoist.

In South Africa, it is a legal requirement that a short length of the front end of each winder rope on a mine hoist is cut off on a regular basis. Then, this wire rope sample is submitted to a testing laboratory for destructive testing and inspection, to monitor the residual strength of the rope. It is normal practice to replace the humble hook at the same time that the front end is cut. The humble hook in service is removed and the tested humble hook is installed in its place. To date, this is one of the largest manufacturing projects Yale Lifting Solutions has carried out in its newly formed manufacturing department.

Christie Lagowski

Christie Lagowski is a Communications Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

Custom Spreader Unloads Transport Trucks in a Fraction of the Time

Custom Spreader Unloads Transport Trucks in a Fraction of the Time

Grabber #1 Grabber #2

Columbus McKinnon Corporation in South Africa recently supplied a motorized, radio remote controlled spreader to the automotive industry. This spreader was custom designed for lifting bundles of metal sheeting in loads of up to 10 tons at a time. This lifting solution was a joint effort by our Durban technical sales team in conjunction with the client.

The application previously used a spreader with synthetic slings which were covered with “PU” (polyurethane) coating. The downside of this process was that it was time consuming and cumbersome.  The new spreader now unloads transport trucks in a fraction of the time. Transporting the sheets of steel to the presses is also much safer.

The spreader is equipped with a number of failsafe features. One feature is that the jaws cannot open when lifting, lowering or positioning a load via a failsafe clutch system.

This application was submitted by Graham Campbell, Sales Director of our office in Westmead, South Africa.

Gisela Clark

Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.

Mobile test rig enhances safety of South African mines

Mobile test rig enhances safety of South African mines

 

This month our Global Traveler heads to South Africa, where a mobile test rig is used by our distributor to test chain hoists and slings at various mine sites. There is a charge for this service and it is deemed to be a valuable contribution to the safety of their mines. On set days the testing team visits a mine site and tests all the chain hoists and slings in the rigger’s stores. If any are found to have inadequate brakes or minor defects, they are usually repaired on site and retested. If a major repair is required, the hoist is sent to the distributor for repair. Comprehensive records are compiled for each item for the mine and these are kept on site.

Today’s Global Traveler feature was provided by Roger Day, the Managing Director of our facility in Westmead, South Africa.

Gisela Clark

Gisela Clark is an eMarketing Specialist for Columbus McKinnon Corporation.